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Historians Claim Holy Grail Sits In Spanish Museum

04/01/2014 05:27 pm ET | Updated Apr 02, 2014
CESAR MANSO via Getty Images

Let's hope they did not choose... poorly.

Two historians claim they've identified the holy grail that Jesus drank from at the last supper, according to AFP.

León University medieval history lecturer Margarita Torres and art historian José Manuel Ortega del Rio make the claim in their book "Kings of the Grail," published last week.

Crowds flocked to see the goblet of the Infanta Doña Urraca in the Basilica of San Isidoro in León, northern Spain once the historians' claim came to light.

The Australian explains the historians' case.

In 2011, two medieval Egyptian parchments were discovered that mentioned the chalice of Christ, saying it was taken from Jerusalem to Cairo. From there, records show that an emir in Muslim Spain received it as a reward for helping the Egyptians during a famine. Finally, it arrived in Christendom in the 11th century after being presented to King Fernando as a gift.

The researchers' investigation "led them to identify the upper part of [the Doña Urraca] goblet, made of agate and missing a fragment as described in the parchments, as the grail," according to the Guardian.

But — and this is a big but — the historians admit that the goblet's first 400 years of history are unknown, New York Post reports.

That hasn't stopped hoards of people from visiting the potentially sacred cup.

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  • Known until now as the goblet of the Infanta Dona Urraca (L) - daughter of Fernando I, King of Leon from 1037 to 1065 - is displayed in the Basilica of San Isidoro in Leon, northern Spain on March 31, 2014. Spanish researchers Margarita Torres and Jose Miguel Ortega del Rio reveal in their book 'The kings of the Grail' that they have found the goblet from which Jesus Christ supposedly sipped during the Last Supper. After a three year hunt begining with Egyptian parchments the two historians claim the mythical object of countless quests in literature and art has actually been lying for nearly a millennium in a basilica in the northwestern Spanish city of Leon.   AFP PHOTO/ CESAR MANSO (Photo credit should read CESAR MANSO/AFP/Getty Images)
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  • Two employees of of the museum and a guest (R) watch what was known until now as the goblet of the Infanta Dona Urraca - daughter of Fernando I, King of Leon from 1037 to 1065 - in the museum of the Basilica of San Isidoro in Leon, northern Spain on March 31, 2014.
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