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Greta Van Susteren To Jon Stewart: 'Two Wrongs Don't Make A Right'

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GRETA VAN SUSTEREN
Television personality Greta Van Susteren of FOX News Channel listens as Gary Pruitt, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Associated Press, speaks at the National Press Club (NPC) in Washington, Wednesday, June 19, 2013. Pruitt, addressing a luncheon at the NPC, spoke about how the Justice Department violated its own rules in subpoenaing AP phone records. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) | ASSOCIATED PRESS

Greta Van Susteren was not a fan of Jon Stewart's recent commentary about Fox News' Benghazi coverage.

Fox News is digging in on Benghazi again, and Stewart mocked the network on Monday night, asking where its outrage over the Iraq War had been during the Bush years.

"Besides the obvious — that almost all the Democrats in Congress voted for the war in Iraq and other media reporting – is my simple note to Stewart: 2 wrongs don’t make a right," Van Susteren wrote on her blog Tuesday. The Fox News host added that she believes the comedian is "smart and clever …but like the rest of us, not always right."

Critics of the Obama administration seized on a new email released last week, insisting that it showed the White House sought to blame the September 11, 2012 attack on the American compound in Benghazi, Libya, on an anti-Muslim video in order to protect its image during an election year. In the wake of the release, House Speaker John Boehner announced plans to form a select committee to investigate the attack — a move that House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer has said he is urging Democrats in Congress to vote against.

The email from Obama deputy national security advisor Ben Rhodes to Susan Rice advised Rice "to underscore that these protests are rooted in an Internet video, and not a broader failure of policy." White House press secretary Jay Carney said last week that the email was not about Benghazi, but about unrest in the Muslim world at large, and that Rice's statements about Benghazi were based what intelligence sources believed at the time.

CORRECTION: The U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi was not an embassy as it was originally called in this article.