Here's How James Lankford Could Bring Some Much-Needed Diversity To The Senate

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JAMES LANKFORD
James Lankford, left, a candidate in Oklahoma's 5th Congressional District's GOP runoff election, gestures as he answers a question during a forum with his opponent, Kevin Calvey, right, Wednesday, Aug. 18, 2010, in Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki) | ASSOCIATED PRESS

He may be a white male, but the new Republican U.S. Senate hopeful from Oklahoma could bring some much-needed color to the upper chamber -- at least as far as hair follicles are concerned.

Rep. James Lankford (R-Okla.), who won a crowded GOP primary to replace retiring Sen. Tom Coburn (R) Tuesday night, stands a good chance of taking his ginger locks to the Senate.

If he does defeat his Democratic opponent in November, as most observers expect in traditionally red Oklahoma, Lankford will not only represent residents of the Sooner State but also a good swath of America.

Red hair is said to occur naturally on approximately 1 to 2 percent of the world's population, according to the BBC. In the United States, that would equal approximately 3 million to 6 million redheads.

Lankford isn't the only lawmaker to boast red hair. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) also has the honor of that distinction. Over in the lower chamber, Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-Mass.) represents red hair magnificently.

CORRECTION: This article originally stated that the population of red-haired Americans is estimated to be approximately 300,000 to 600,000. It is 3 million to 6 million.

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