POLITICS

Andrew Cuomo Loses NY Times Endorsement, Paper Cites Ethics 'Failure'

08/26/2014 05:04 pm ET | Updated Aug 26, 2014
ASSOCIATED PRESS

The New York Times editorial board announced it would not be endorsing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) in the upcoming September primary for governor.

Mr. Cuomo became governor on that platform and recorded several impressive achievements, but he failed to perform Job 1. The state government remains as subservient to big money as ever, and Mr. Cuomo resisted and even shut down opportunities to fix it. Because he broke his most important promise, we have decided not to make an endorsement for the Democratic primary on Sept. 9.

Tuesday's announcement, while not all that surprising considering Cuomo has been the subject of several extensive Times investigations in recent months, is still a crucial blow to the governor's image touting himself as a true progressive dedicated to reform.

The mostly symbolic message follows allegations that the governor routinely interfered with the Moreland Commission, an independent panel Cuomo himself created to fight corruption, after the commission began looking into cases carrying potential political consequences for him and his allies.

Cuomo has repeatedly denied the claims.

The Times did acknowledge, however, that Cuomo is still likely to secure a primary victory against challenger Zephyr Teachout because of his "vastly greater resources and name recognition."

As for Teachout, the paper applauded her commitment to deliver substantive change and transparency to the office, but declined to fully endorse her candidacy due to a lack of experience

A recent poll found only 9 percent of likely Democratic voters were even aware of who she was.

Cuomo attempted to remove her from the primary ballot, arguing Teachout did not meet the state's constitutional residency requirements mandating candidates live in New York for five consecutive years.

A judge dismissed the lawsuit.

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