Lawmakers, Religious Leaders Argue Against Gay Marriage At 'Washington: A Man Of Prayer' Event In D.C.

05/01/2015 01:16 pm ET | Updated Feb 02, 2016

Moments of the annual "Washington: A Man of Prayer" event took on a decidedly anti-marriage equality tone this year.

Held in the U.S. Capitol's Statuary Hall, the two-hour prayer service commemorates the anniversary of George Washington's first presidential inauguration on April 29. The event, which is now in its fourth year, brings members of Congress together with Christian leaders to "honor Washington as a man of Christian faith."

Among the many speakers at "A Man of Prayer," which was hosted by Sen. James Lankford (R-Oklahoma) and Rep. Randy Forbes (R-Virginia), was Rep. Bill Flores (R-Texas), who earlier this week made headlines for linking same-sex marriage rights to the Baltimore riots.

Flores re-iterated his opposition to marriage equality in his speech, describing the U.S. as a "troubled nation" as the Supreme Court begins to hear arguments over whether or not states can prohibit same-sex marriage, Right Wing Watch reported.

"It truly seems like we're a troubled nation today," he said, as seen in the video clip above. "Think about the ridicule of the traditional family, of a man and a woman joined together in a sacred bond of marriage."

Echoing those sentiments was End Times rabbi Jonathan Cahn, who warned of the potential consequences if the Supreme Court "should overrule the word of God" by "striking down the biblical and historic definition of marriage."

"We have become a civilization in spiritual schizophrenia, a nation at war against its own foundation," he said. "If this honorable court should overrule the word of God and strike down the eternal rules of order that Heaven itself hath ordained, how then will God save it? Supreme Court justices, can you judge the ways of God?"

He then added, "There is another court and there is another judge and before him, all men and all judges will give account."

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