QUEER VOICES

Rainbows Form Over Dublin As Ireland Votes To Legalize Gay Marriage

05/23/2015 03:06 pm ET | Updated Feb 02, 2016

In a historic vote, Ireland passed a referendum to legalize gay marriage. As voters in the Irish capital of Dublin went to the polls on Friday, some noticed a fitting accompaniment from Mother Nature.

Official results showed that the referendum passed with 62 percent support, according to Reuters.

Ireland becomes the first country in the world to legalize gay marriage via popular vote.

Related on HuffPost:

  • Peter Morrison/AP
    Carmelite sisters leave a polling station in Malahide, County Dublin, Ireland, Friday, May 22, 2015. Ireland began voting Friday in a referendum on Gay marriage which will require an amendment to the Irish constitution. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
  • Peter Morrison/AP
    Women cast their vote in a polling station in Malahide, County Dublin, Ireland, Friday, May 22, 2015. Ireland began voting Friday in a referendum on Gay marriage which will require an amendment to the Irish constitution. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
  • Peter Morrison/AP
    Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny arrives to meet with members of the Yes Equality campaign during a photo call in Dublin, Ireland, Thursday May 21, 2015. The Irish Prime Minister is appealing to Ireland's voters to support the legalization of gay marriage in a referendum that pits the power of the Catholic Church against his government. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
  • Peter Morrison/AP
    YES posters cover a shop's windows in the center of Dublin, Ireland, Thursday May 21, 2015. People from across the Republic of Ireland will vote Friday in a referendum on the legalization of gay marriage, a vote that pits the power of the Catholic Church against the secular-minded Irish government of Enda Kenny. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
  • Peter Morrison/AP
    Members of the Yes Equality campaign gather in the center of Dublin, Ireland, Thursday May 21, 2015. People from across the Republic of Ireland will vote Friday in a referendum on the legalization of gay marriage, a vote that pits the power of the Catholic Church against the secular-minded Irish government of Enda Kenny. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
  • Peter Morrison/AP
    In this Tuesday, May 19, 2015 photo, yes campaign posters are seen in Dublin, Ireland, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Barely a generation ago, Ireland listed homosexual acts as a crime and made gays lead secret lives or emigrate to more liberal lands. But on Friday, May 22, 2015, in the worlds first national referendum on the matter, the Irish could vote to legalize same-sex marriage. The contest has pit the waning power of the Catholic Church against the secular-minded government of Prime Minister Enda Kenny. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
  • Peter Morrison/AP
    In this Tuesday, May 19, 2015 photo, no campaign posters are seen in the village of Knock, Ireland, Barely a generation ago, Ireland listed homosexual acts as a crime and made gays lead secret lives or emigrate to more liberal lands. But on Friday, May 22, 2015, in the worlds first national referendum on the matter, the Irish could vote to legalize same-sex marriage. The contest has pit the waning power of the Catholic Church against the secular-minded government of Prime Minister Enda Kenny. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
  • AP
    In this Tuesday, May 19, 2015 photo, a mural depicting a lesbian couple, a 46 feet high print made of biodegradable paper with a potato-based adhesive made by artist Joe Caslin, is seen on the wall of the 15th century Caher Castle, Caherkinmonwee, Galway, Ireland. Barely a generation ago, Ireland listed homosexual acts as a crime and made gays lead secret lives or emigrate to more liberal lands. But on Friday, May 22, 2015, in the worlds first national referendum on the matter, the Irish could vote to legalize same-sex marriage. The contest has pit the waning power of the Catholic Church against the secular-minded government of Prime Minister Enda Kenny. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
  • Shawn Pogatchnik/AP
    In this Thursday, April 23, 2015 photo, a gay rights mural decorates the side of a building in central Dublin, Ireland. Barely a generation ago, Ireland listed homosexual acts as a crime and made gays lead secret lives or emigrate to more liberal lands. But on Friday, May 22, 2015, in the worlds first national referendum on the matter, the Irish could vote to legalize same-sex marriage. The contest has pit the waning power of the Catholic Church against the secular-minded government of Prime Minister Enda Kenny. (AP Photo/Shawn Pogatchnik)
  • Niall Carson/PA Wire
    Members of the public beside a mural in Dublin's Temple Bar area by street artist SUMS supporting a yes vote in the forthcoming Gay Marriage referendum in Ireland.
  • PAUL FAITH via Getty Images
    Mary Cassidy (R) drops her ballot paper in the ballot box at a polling station in Drumcondra, north Dublin on May 22, 2015. Ireland took to the polls today to vote on whether same-sex marriage should be legal, in a referendum that has exposed sharp divisions between communities in this traditionally Catholic nation.
  • PAUL FAITH via Getty Images
    A mural in favour of same-sex marriage is pictured on a wall in Dublin on May 21, 2015. Ireland goes to the polls tomorrow to vote on whether same-sex marriage should be legal, in a referendum that has exposed sharp divisions between communities in this traditionally Catholic nation.
  • PAUL FAITH via Getty Images
    Pedestrians walk past a banner in favour of same-sex marriages in Dublin on May 21, 2015. Ireland goes to the polls tomorrow to vote on whether same-sex marriage should be legal, in a referendum that has exposed sharp divisions between communities in this traditionally Catholic nation.
  • PAUL FAITH via Getty Images
    A man walks past a mural in favour of same-sex marriages in Dublin on May 21, 2015. Ireland goes to the polls tomorrow to vote on whether same-sex marriage should be legal, in a referendum that has exposed sharp divisions between communities in this traditionally Catholic nation.
  • PAUL FAITH via Getty Images
    Pedestrians walk past a mural in favour of same-sex marriages in Dublin on May 21, 2015. Ireland goes to the polls tomorrow to vote on whether same-sex marriage should be legal, in a referendum that has exposed sharp divisions between communities in this traditionally Catholic nation.
  • Charles McQuillan via Getty Images
    A man walks past a gay bar promoting the Yes campaign in favour of same-sex marriage on May 22, 2015 in Dublin, Ireland. Voters in the Republic of Ireland are taking part in a referendum on legalising same-sex marriage on Friday. The referendum is being held 22 years after Ireland decriminalised homosexuality with more than 3.2m people being asked whether they want to amend the country's constitution to allow gay and lesbian couples to marry. Polling stations opened at 07:00 BST with voting continuing until 22:00 BST and counting due to start on Saturday morning.
  • Charles McQuillan via Getty Images
    An unidentified man takes a selfie against the backdrop of a catholic church and directions to a polling station on May 22, 2015 in Dublin, Ireland. Voters in the Republic of Ireland are taking part in a referendum on legalising same-sex marriage on Friday. The referendum is being held 22 years after Ireland decriminalised homosexuality with more than 3.2m people being asked whether they want to amend the country's constitution to allow gay and lesbian couples to marry. Polling stations opened at 07:00 BST with voting continuing until 22:00 BST and counting due to start on Saturday morning. (Photo by Charles McQuillan/Getty Images)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Partners Adrian, centre left and Shane, leave a polling station after casting their vote in Drogheda, Ireland, Friday, May 22, 2015. Ireland began voting Friday in a referendum on Gay marriage which will require an amendment to the Irish constitution. Opinion polls throughout the two-month campaign suggest the government-backed amendment should be approved by the required majority of voters when results are announced Saturday. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
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