7 Numbers That Will Make You Feel Better About Aging

06/05/2015 07:23 am ET | Updated Jun 05, 2015
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Aging is not without a few pitfalls. But here are seven numbers that should bring you some comfort:

People who survive to age 65 can expect to live an average of 19.2 more years. This is nearly five years longer than people who turned age 65 in 1960, according to Of course mere longevity isn't the goal; we are living not just longer but also healthier lives.

The average age of a woman entering menopause is 51. Why is this such an important number? Read on.

The age of the German woman who just gave birth to quadruplets. While some might question why teacher Annegret Raunigk, who already has 13 children, would want to add to their family at age 65, we prefer to give the mom the benefit of the doubt. Let's just say it's never too late to chase your reality TV show dreams.

66 percent.
Among people 85 and older, 34 percent have no natural teeth left. That means 66 percent of people 85 plus still do! Brushing, flossing, and using fluoride toothpaste will mean even more people can keep their chompers.

25 percent.
According to Britain's Office for National Statistics, the number of grooms in their late 60s increased by 25 percent from 2011 to 2012 while brides of the same age went up by 21 percent. One in 10 had been single, two-thirds divorced, and the rest widowed before tying the knot. Overall, the marriage rate increased in that same period by just 5 percent. Maybe by our 60s, we've figured out why Noah had the animals board the ark in pairs?

1 in 10.
Despite all the ads for Depends, just 10 percent of people 65 and older suffer from urinary incontinence. While UI does become more common with age, aging does not cause it. The disease can be treated, controlled, and often cured.

Those aged 65 to 69 take an average of 15 prescriptions per year, while those who are age 80 to 84 hover around 18 different pill bottles, according to the American Association of Consultant Pharmacists. Most elderly advocates agree that's a lot, especially for older people whose bodies don't metabolize the drugs as quickly as younger patients. Why should these numbers cheer you? We're guessing you don't take 15 pills a day.

Earlier on HuffPost50:

11 Easy Ways To Shorten Your Life
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