If Your Childhood Idols Were Mary-Kate And Ashley Olsen, This One's For You

06/13/2015 01:33 pm ET | Updated Jun 13, 2015
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If you grew up in the '90s/early aughts and ever once attended a sleepover, you are likely familiar with the beauty that is Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen original films. If you grew up in the '90s/early aughts and ever once turned on a television, you are likely also familiar with the joys of the twins' series "Two of a Kind" and "So Little Time."

Basically, if you grew up in the nineties/early aughts, you likely straight up idolized Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen characters because they were the epitome of teen girl cool. (Not to mention the sisters themselves, but like, it's all related.)

In honor of the twins' birthday on June 13, 1986, and the recent announcement that much of their content library will air anew on Nickelodeon to inspire a new generation of teen envy, The Huffington Post compiled all the reasons you obviously wanted to be a Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen character when you were a youngster.

1. They had the chillest names.
Names have vibes. And Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen characters always had names with vibes that were chill as heck. This is potentially best exemplified by Chloe and Riley -- what we would give to have either one of these names -- which they used both in "Winning London" and "So Little Time." (And, as Gawker so astutely pointed out, were assigned to a different twin in each project ... possibly so both sisters got to feel the distinct cool vibe of each name?)

The chill vibes of these names is not explainable by logic. But it is there -- and you know it's there.

2. They were in touch with their true selves.
Mary-Kate and Ashley characters often had opposite personalities that clashed in ways that inspired true hilarity. In "New York Minute," for example, they played Roxy and Jane -- the former, a rocker, the latter an academic overachiever. Though the different characters often have to learn to understand each another, they don't apologize for being the way they are. As youths, weren't we all just trying to find our authentic identities? (Actually as adults too. Thanks for the guidance, MK and A!)

3. Hair game on fleek.


No words necessary.

4. They traveled.
"Passport to Paris," "Winning London," "Our Lips Are Sealed," "Holiday in the Sun," etc. The premise of most of the Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen adventures had in some way to do with going to a new beautiful city (and probably accidentally getting involved in a weird crime ring by sheer misfortune).

5. They always had prime love interests, no matter their locale.
Wherever they traveled, great crush prospects who were always also into the girls just appeared. For most of us humanoids, it's hard enough to find this while living somewhere full time. But in Olsen-character land, successful crushes grow on whatever trees are native to the region.

6. They had chicken fights with hot guys.
OK, yes, this was only in "Holiday in the Sun." But we call BS if you say recreating this cool nighttime chicken fight wasn't, like, top of your summer goals list every year. (And, realistically, probably never achieved.)

The Atlantis pool escapade was also just one of many times the twins' movie characters broke rules in pursuit of adventure, and even if they did get in trouble, they never got in enough to really sabotage their prospects. This kind of balanced rule-breaking that provides adrenaline-rush fun without severe consequences is not usually a possibility in real life. (Unless maybe you're as privileged as the "Holiday in the Sun" characters clearly were ...)

7. They always got around pesky-ass adults.
Parents getting in the way of you doing what you want to do is one of the most irritating parts of adolescence. But in Olsen movies and TV shows, parents' rules were basically just a suggestion. (They usually had no idea what was going on with the accidental international crime ring anyway. So it was best to IGNORE.)

8. They both had an amazing partner in crime.

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