WOMEN
07/08/2015 12:34 pm ET Updated Jul 08, 2015

This Is How Women Really Feel About Disclosing What They Earn

women earnings

There are many things a woman is not "supposed" to share, like how much she weighs or how old she is.

Also on that list: How much money she earns.

In late April, software developer Lauren Voswinkel urged people to tweet their salaries using the hashtag #talkpay. "To truly begin to eradicate pay inequality, we need a radical discussion," Voswinkel wrote in a blog post introducing the hashtag. Hundreds of people shared their salaries -- along with information about their career experience, benefits, bonuses, gender and ethnicity -- in the name of promoting earnings transparency and closing the gender pay gap.

In a May 2015 piece for Wired, Emily Dreyfuss shared her unwillingness to discuss her salary, and explored why this attitude can be harmful.

"This aversion to speaking about money is not just harmful in the way it perpetuates inequality by keeping from workers the very basic data we need to negotiate with our employers on our own behalf," Dreyfuss wrote. "It’s also just plain stupid because it asks us to pretend that money is some kind of afterthought. That it is not, in fact, the whole point of employment. Of course it is!"

We asked our Facebook community who they felt comfortable sharing their salary information with, and why. Here is what women from their 20s to their 50s had to say about disclosing what they make:

women in their 20s

" I'm not entirely sure why it's so taboo to talk about salaries in 2015."

"I'll talk openly with my close friends, family and significant other but I don't think there is any reason for someone else/a stranger to know. With that being said, I'm not entirely sure why it's so taboo to talk about salaries in 2015 outside of it opening up the possibility of others judging you one way or another. For me, it's a matter of if I trust the person or not."
-- Kristen, age 21, Rochester, NY

"Personally I think your salary is your private business."

If people feel the need to flaunt their wealth or tell the world about their salary then that's their journey, but personally, I think your salary is your private business. The only person that I would discuss my earnings with is my husband (If I ever get married)...as far as sharing that kind of info with anyone else, I wouldn't, because its none of their business and there's not even a point in doing so."
-- Alyssa, age 23, Miami, FL

women in their 30s

"I see no benefit of attempting to keep that information private."

"I work in an industry where salary and budget information is public knowledge. It is also reviewed, amended and voted on by a large body of members. In my opinion I think there is something to learn from an industry like mine and I see no benefit of attempting to keep that information private. There is something powerful and liberating about engaging the dialogue in regards to fair compensation, power and labor justice. In my industry privacy would only serve to foster unfair labor practices and discrimination."
-- Darlene, age 38, Philadelphia, PA

"I share that information with very few people i.e.; spouse, immediate family."

"[Your salary is] absolutely private information. I've always maintained my own bank account and bills (even when I was married for 10 years). I share that information with very few people i.e.; spouse, immediate family. I've noticed that when friends know how much you make and you make a significantly more substantial amount of money than they do, they make snide remarks (you don't understand their struggle), tend to be slow at pulling out their wallets to pay their tabs, and often want to borrow money."
-- Melissa, age 36, Chicago, IL

women in their 40s

"I share."

"I share. There needs to be more discussion about why women are paid less."
-- Jackie, age 49

"My husband and I discuss money issues, nobody else."

"Some things are best kept private. If you make too much, some people may think you're bragging. If you make too little, they will use it against you. Dating? No way I would discuss salary. My husband and I discuss money issues, nobody else."
-- Maria, age 45, Fredericksburg, VA

women in their 50s

"I'm proud of what I've accomplished, and that includes my salary."

"I'm perfectly comfortable disclosing my financial information. I went to school and worked hard to get where I am. I'm proud of what I've accomplished, and that includes my salary. Men like the money but are uncomfortable with the reality that I earn more than they do. What a double standard."
-- Margaret, age 52

"Once you start discussing finances it's like a dam has burst."

"My income is absolutely private. If I was getting married, or living common law, that person would know, and my kids, but I find once you start discussing finances it's like a dam has burst. Just knowing someone's salary without knowing their bills is useless information anyway."
-- Caroline, age 51, British Columbia, Canada

How do you feel about sharing your salary? Comment below, or tweet @HuffPostWomen!

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