THE BLOG
04/25/2014 01:25 pm ET | Updated Jun 25, 2014

Apple vs Samsung: The Battle for the Green Halo

By Alison van Diggelen, host of Fresh Dialogues

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Yesterday, I was invited to join the live BBC World Service show, Business Matters to discuss Apple's green manifesto and its rivalry with Samsung. I was interviewed by the BBC's talented Manuela Saragosa. Here's a transcript of the highlights. Listen to the full interview here (our discussion starts at 26:00).

Saragosa: It was Earth Day on Tuesday... there's been no dimming of the lights here at the BBC...but technology giant, Apple has been laying out its green manifesto to mark Earth Day. The company's CEO Tim Cook put out a video, announcing a new scheme that allows any product made by Apple to be returned to the company for recycling.

Our guest, Alison van Diggelen is in California's Silicon Valley. Alison, green business issues are your thing, what do you make of Apple's manifesto? Is there substance to it do you think?

van Diggelen: I think there is substance to it. The reason they put out this video is: Greenpeace has been snapping at Apple's heels for quite some time. I did a story a couple of years ago (for NPR's KQED Radio) when they were looking at data centers. Greenpeace came up with their own quasi Apple ad (cunningly called iCoal, see below), showing that every time you download something or send a photo on your iPhone, you're putting more smog into the atmosphere. It was very clever and got Apple's attention, and now they're really moving ahead (According to a recent EPA report - Apple is now in the top 10 clean energy users nationally and uses 92% clean energy). One of their major data centers (in North Carolina) where they do Apple iCloud, has 100% green power: clean energy, using solar and fuel cells.

In the video, they're doing a little chest thumping, saying "Look at us - here's what we're doing!" And of course, launching it on the week of Earth Day was a very clever move, a strategic move...

I do think Apple deserves to be lauded. It could do more, but I think shining a light on what it's doing so far is good.

Saragosa: But it's come a hugely long way. I know that in 2006, Greenpeace published its first guide to green electronics and at that point it rated Apple among the worst companies (it ranked 11 out of 14 companies). I suppose things have changed quite a lot since then.

van Diggelen: Yes. I think Greenpeace deserves credit for doing what it can to put the pressure on. This report it released went through all the major tech companies: Google, Apple, Facebook, Twitter (Amazon), saying: "Here's what they're doing folks!" Companies that you think of as pretty green and green advocates like Google, they're not doing enough. They could do more.

The interesting thing with Tim Cook that your listeners will definitely be interested in is that at a recent shareholders' meeting, someone stood up and said: "We don't like what you're doing with all those clean energy data centers. Couldn't you be using your funds to make better products...do other things?"

Saragosa: But is that a widely held view?

van Diggelen: This is the interesting thing: Tim Cook struck back at them. He said: "We believe that we must make the world a better place." He stood up and said this to the shareholders..."If you don't agree with it, sell your shares!" Which was quite gutsy of him I thought. Since then Richard Branson (CEO Virgin Atlantic etc) has said the same (He recently wrote, "Businesses should never be entirely focused on the bottom line...I would urge climate deniers to get out of our way!") So I think it's great to see high profile CEO's like Tim Cook and Richard Branson are doing that, and saying: Hey! We need to think about the environment, we need to think about our impact on the environment. I'm cheered by that.

Listen to more of our discussion re Apple vs Samsung battle, copycats, tech recycling, green building and one innovative way China is dealing with its killer pollution.

Read more about Apple's green manifesto at Fresh Dialogues and about Google's Green Dream at Fresh Dialogues