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These Waterfront Homes Are Lakeside Living At Its Best

06/10/2015 11:32 am ET | Updated Jun 10, 2016

By Colleen Egan for Architectural Digest.

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(photo: Peter Estersohn)

The owner of this four-story, stone-and-shingle house in upstate New York bought two neighboring parcels of land to give it more estate-like grounds. Architect John I. Meyer Jr. of Meyer and Meyer Architecture and Interiors renovated the 1902 home.

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(photo: Peter Estersohn)

For this cedar-shingled home on Upper Saranac Lake, architecture firm Shope Reno Wharton drew inspiration from the Gilded Age great camps in New York's Adirondack Mountains.

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(photo: Joshua McHugh)

Montana home, which features a sunrise porch on the east end and a sunset porch on the west end.

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(photo: Paul Warchol)

This modern Lake Michigan home by Peter Gluck and Partners is built to LEED standards, which is rare for a large residential project.

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(photo: Björn Wallander)

The former boathouse of a family estate on Wisconsin's Geneva Lake, this unusual structure is referred to by locals as "No-Go," a ship that refuses to budge.

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(photo: Peter Estersohn)

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