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3 Savvy Secrets to Find Your Wedding Style From Top Wedding Bloggers

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Wedding Video Philadelphia

Photo by Lindsay Docherty Photography

You're about to blow this fat wad of cash on one day, but Pinterest is putting so much pressure on you to invent a wedding style! Everywhere you look there are gorgeous ways to look "unique" on your wedding day. Before blowing it all on a dress, venue, and place-settings that aren't you, take a look at these tips from the top wedding bloggers to find the wedding style that is truly you.

Step away from that pinboard!

Fess up. How many hours of productivity is your boss losing on your mad Pinterest wedding habit? The fact is, Pinterest can paralyze you from making decisions about your wedding, or worse, make copycat decisions that aren't even you.

"When I began planning my wedding, I was really enamored with Pinterest, and spent hours pouring over all the gorgeous and clever photos and ideas," says Renee of That Bride's Got Moxie. "Of course, I was pinning with a wild abandon. Anything goes! But, one day I went and looked at my pin board with fresh eyes and I thought, "Who pinned all this?" I am a born and raised New York City gal. I was not going to have a barn wedding with my guests sitting on bales on hay. It's just not me. Furthermore, it wasn't my fiancé either."

"Keep it timeless. Don't choose a style just because it's this season's trend." suggest Cassandra of When Geeks Wed. "In 20 years, are you going to look back and think, what was I thinking... troll dolls in my wedding bouquet? Keep it true to yourself, throw tradition and what's expected out the door if it's not right for you. Remember it's YOUR wedding so breathe, have fun and don't go too crazy."

Look to your home, especially your closet

No joke. Your shoe collection should have a greater impact on your wedding style than your Pinterest boards.

Jocey and Amy of the Wedding Chicks say, "Wedding style should be determined by your personal style -- the way you dress, decorate your space and express yourself. Incorporate elements that you and your partner love that will signify you as a couple. Guests should be reminded of you as they experience your day through the details."

"Do you trend toward modern, clean lines in your wardrobe? Retro and quirky? Romantic, soft textures?" asks Dana of the Broke-Ass Bride. "Explore similar fabrics and styles in bridal wear, and you'll not only feel like yourself in your wedding garb, but you'll let your personality shine through. But when you're browsing and shopping, be experimental. You never know what hidden corner of you might erupt on the spot to say "Look at me! I'm the perfectly beautiful bridal ME!"

Don't forget to look to your living room. Your style choices in decorating your home should shine through on your wedding day.

"Style isn't created. It's who you are. How is your house decorated? What do you wear on a Saturday? The things around you will inspire the type of wedding you should have." says Raquel Kelley of I Guess I Do.

Step beyond the Pantone pressure. Yes, I know Pantone just released the 2014 colors, and everyone is planning to have radiant orchid gowns now.

Angelica of the Bridal Detective says "Wedding style goes beyond current trending colors or themes. I love vintage infused with glamorous accents but add in a few traditional ideas and it's the makings of a stylish get-together. If you find yourself gravitating towards a bold black and white chevron rug for your living room versus a beige floral rug, then you may find your style leans more towards modern than traditional and that pattern could play a big role in the aesthetic of your wedding design."

Need a little help translating your closet to your wedding style? Try this fun game based on your home and wardrobe to figure out your wedding style.

Look at your venue

The venue is probably going to be the biggest part of your budget. The last thing you want to do is clash with your surroundings!

Even before looking at your venue, Martine of Primp My Bride (Mrs. Mongoose on WeddingBee) suggests closing your eyes and envisioning your wedding. If you envision your wedding at a hotel or art gallery, chances are your wedding style falls more towards modern and elegant. If in a barn, rustic/vintage may be your cup of tea. If outdoors in a garden, your style may lean more towards the romantic.

But what if you already booked the venue? I mean, really, isn't that the first phone call after he pops the question? Well, Renee suggests letting the venue set the tone for your wedding style.

"Once we decided on a ballroom wedding in the heart of Old City Philadelphia, I let the venue inform most of my decisions. So, I say -- have your ideas, pin your little heart out, and then step back. Take a look at your venue first. I changed my wedding gown ideas once we picked our venue. Thank God I hadn't rushed out and bought the first dress I loved! I would have looked totally out of place at my own wedding! Then the dress dictated the veil, and all of that together dictated my hair and makeup and accessories! It's a gradual process, I believe.

I figured out our wedding style by assessing who my husband and I are as a couple, and the kind of wedding we wanted to host. We decided on a fun and formal theme, and that's exactly what we got. A crazy awesome dance party in a super elegant, old-school ballroom."

Dana suggests not deciding on a gown until you've lined up your venue and time of year, because they'll help determine what kinds of fabrics and styles will be comfortable and appropriate. "And most importantly, have fun! You'll be beautiful, no matter what you wear... because happiness is the best accessory of all."

Make it Happen!

"Now take your unique style and translate it into your wedding style. Don't try to incorporate everything you love into your wedding. Pick your colors, pick your theme (which can be something as specific as Harry Potter, a mood like a season, a simple design element like chevrons or even a material like wood) and then commit," Cassandra adds.