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Christine Eilvig Headshot

The Many Choices

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A lot of people experience difficulties in making choices. Maybe you are one of them? The type who needs to think things over. Often in a way where you end up stuck and paralyzed.

When we have difficulties in making choices, it's often connected to the fact that we are afraid of making a so-called wrong choice.

We think that as long as we haven't made a choice, there's no risk of failing. We can also fear the consequences of our mistakes and therefore procrastinate forever. The logic behind that thinking is that as long as we haven't made a decision, it won't have any consequences.

Sometimes we hold stories and beliefs that we need clarity or that we are unable to feel the right solution. That reasoning is often the result of not having made a decision yet. Clarity abounds when the decision is made.

The problem with an indecisive energy is that nothing can materialize. We end up with a feeling of being stuck, and with our resistant energy come the blocks and all the issues that we then need to spend our time on.

The secret lies in finding our way back to the energy we had as children, where we just dove right into life and course-corrected with deep confidence when things didn't work out. Where our choices were a lot more connected to our hearts and desires.

From there very little can go wrong, and life becomes a lot more free and fun. In reality, many roads lead to our happiness. We don't need to get lost in the many details.

As we try out different things, we can make a note of what we like and what we don't like. The so-called "mistakes" are a great way of getting to know ourselves, as long as we don't repeat them too many times.

Decisions and choices give momentum and then we are rolling. From there, energy can move and things can land. The choice is ours. We can't do anything wrong, and we can always make new choices. Things are rarely so serious and final as they seem.


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