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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Brandt931
03:56 PM on 11/02/2011
You mean they are listening? We are in the midst of the first ever GLOBAL protest against corporate greed and their molestation of our government. People around the world are standing together to raise their voice against the oppression of the 1% and their corporate welfare and lobbying which are eroding our economy and country from the inside out. See my artwork for the movement as well as resources and videos of the protests at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2011/09/occupywallstreet.html Get informed and get involved… all you have to do is raise your voice for change!
03:46 PM on 11/02/2011
This sounds promising, 3% transaction tax on trades. Reinforces long term investment instead of the ridiculous day trading that currently happens. I am particularly happy to see a politician speak of a disaster where laborers died and at the same time mentioning the profits obtained by the employers.
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PalaceOfWisdom
Don't Sleep With Mean People
04:33 PM on 11/02/2011
"It would levy a tax equivalent to three cents for every $100"

It's a 0.03% tax, not enough to do more than make a sound bite. Even then they'd just write loopholes into any such law so certain transactions wouldn't be included, then funnel everything that way. We're being pandered to, nothing more. Think of it as Dodd-Frank 2.0
07:45 PM on 11/02/2011
It will still make an impact on high frequency trading that makes markets so volatile. The "black box" trading machines are programmed to take advantage of trends, so they turn a slight dip into a rout, and a slight uptick into a major surge, and all at a speed that normal investors can't compete with. I've heard experts on Bloomberg say the market is no place now for regular or institutional investors because of black box trading and recommending that people stay out of the market.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
BravoFour
04:43 PM on 11/02/2011
I think it's 0.03%, not 3%. Three cents for every $100.