Post Comment Preview Comment
To reply to a Comment: Click "Reply" at the bottom of the comment; after being approved your comment will appear directly underneath the comment you replied to.
View All
Favorites
Bloggers
Recency  | 
Popularity
Page:  « First  ‹ Previous  1 2 3 4 (4 total)
photo
HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
realitytrumpsbull
Two 'alves of coconut!
12:02 AM on 12/08/2011
I'd say that another politically incorrect opinion to go with my first one(currently under HuffPo censorship review), is that the primary reason for the book's existence is to find an educated-sounding reason for throwing someone in the lockup who behaves differently than is considered 'politically correct'. In other words, it's a government tool. So's the person probably leafing through its' pages, but that's beside the point. Well, maybe not, maybe that IS the point.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Thinkster
I Think, therefore I POST!
03:35 AM on 12/08/2011
Noooo - it's about making money selling snake-oil - always helps to have a manual to keep your lies straight!
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
frank1946
Tell the Truth
11:52 PM on 12/07/2011
The Lexicon of Shrinks is Fun ! So many troubles, so many Billable Hours !

Especially when the Court orders them.

So when do you have these urges to choke the RoseBush ?

I admire Psychiatry, they actually try to help, Psychologists like to talk !
photo
HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
realitytrumpsbull
Two 'alves of coconut!
12:08 AM on 12/08/2011
That presumes you really have a problem to begin with. 'Mental health' first became popular topic of discussion at the beginning of the 20th century, when 'cigar boy' wrote all his stuff, and it just grew up and out from there, like your rosebush. And, it's a thorny topic, the inner workings of the mind, and what motivates people thus-and-so, and why it is they're inclined to sing into the hairbrush in time to the chanting monks, while wearing fishnets and standing on a stepladder, but to each their own, it's just when your personal conduct comes into conflict with The Authorities(or perhaps your less-than-understanding neighbors, which will lead to The Authorities being called), that real problems arise. If you were wealthy, and had your own island, and wanted FOUR peas on your plate, not seven as provided, well, at that point they say "Yes, Mr. Hughes", but in THIS world, in this country at least, people will call you crazy etc. for being too fussy or too obsessed or driven or taken with whatever happens to capture your interest, there.   So, where does 'eccentric' stop, and 'barking mad/community menace' begin? Probably about the time that your mood swings and so forth start to be a problem for others, or you're not being economically productive, and therefore overdue to be replaced with nice, fresh-faced immigrants that'll take the money, keep their heads down, and be quiet if they know what's good for em.   

I think it's all about conformity, establishing a 'normal', and sending the P.D. after anyone that doesn't fit the mold. Maybe time to break the mold, and recycle the Big Book Of Mental Problems?
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
NrthrnLord
Prince of a very small part of the universe.
01:18 AM on 12/08/2011
I'll stick with the McKenna bros. There are other venues for healing that our western approaches won't even consider, i.e. "hallucinogenics," that might, should these dmt containing substance be truly and honestly studied, prove rather interesting indeed, in terms of rattling the bird-cage.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Thinkster
I Think, therefore I POST!
03:40 AM on 12/08/2011
Psychiatry is a popularity contest - Psychology is a Science.

I'll stick with Science - Psychiatrists can keep their snake-oil. And they can buy their own Beemers, too. Not on my dime, thanks.
photo
HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
realitytrumpsbull
Two 'alves of coconut!
11:35 PM on 12/07/2011
I think that a lot of books have been written to date about the deep, mystifying inner workings of the human mind, but until they get it down from DSM to say, Chilton's, something along those lines, they're really not impressing anyone. In other words, it's all educated guesswork. The mind is usually generally believed to reside within the brain, that organ in the body that has most of the synaptic connections and so forth, and where they can pick up all that electrical activity with the sensor-thing.  But, what IS it, how does it really work, and how much of either mental health or illness is frankly in the eye of the beholder?   And, to what extent or degree are any diagnoses, based on DSM or otherwise, honestly of any real merit or value? Can mental illness be faked? If it can, how can you tell if someone's NOT faking? What if YOU think you've got a problem, and the doctor says you're perfectly fine...it's all in your head, or, vice versa, the doctor's basically saying, "I'm OK, but WHAT the @#$# is YOUR problem"!?!?!?!  Or, words to that general effect.   And, maybe some people honestly ARE kind of  messed up in the head, but that being the case, how do you fix it? What kind of Vulcan mind-meld would be required for that operation? Physical medicine can only affect those things it can see, and touch, tangible aspects of the mind, and past procedures such as lobotomy were highly controversial and are today largely banned. But, through physical scanning, MRI, medicine CAN identify abnormal brain structures, such as birth defects, damage, or tumors. We've all known people that have that LARGE one growing right between their ears, but there's a difference between being stubborn, ignorant, ill-mannered, and actually having some kind of medical problem. If you're wandering down the street talking to cars and other objects, and you're not Bluetoothed, and you're also not clothed, you probably will get hauled in for the old psych eval, where among other things they'll try and find out what kind of drugs you might be on.  So, moral of the story is, for all your nutty friends, buy em those cellphone earpieces for Christmas, and tell em to ALWAYS wear em, and be ready for instructions to get to the mothership. Everyone else will think of them as 'normal' American consumers in the middle of that important business call, and the butterfly nets can stay safely nestled in their wall racks along with all the diagnostic mental whatses, which are just hard-bound educated guessing, come right down to it.
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
gmikejake
resist evil
05:33 AM on 12/08/2011
Interesting, and entertaining, post. But some of us have very serious mental health problems that, left untreated, can lead to a life full of horrors and even, sometimes, a premature death .... by unnatural causes. And that is just for the one who is mentally ill ... what about their loving families, wives, husbands, etc?. And then there is, depending, too often, on your demographics, the pursuit of a treatment that they will accept, and then paying for it, and finding a treatment that can work. A relative of mine lived over 5 years of that horror, many suicide attempts, many hospitalizations, many different diagnoses, huge amounts of $$$ were spent, huge family disruption, before a young psychiatrist said "we've tried everything else, let's try this." And over a series of treatments relief was accomplished. Treatment continues, it is a chronic condition, but this relative has a good job and a family now. There is hope.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
libwingoflibwing
Leftist, Christian, Non-Violent Revolutionary
11:30 PM on 12/07/2011
I am a licensed mental health counselor and work with the DSM all the time with clients.

This article doesn't speak to a real issue with the DSM. We have a medical system that requires a diagnosis and a prescribed, manualized treatment before insurance will pay. (This is true with Medicare/Medicaid too.) One can't get reimbursement because one feels lousy and wants to talk to a listening, supportive, caring mental health professional. One has to fit into one of the diagnoses of a mood disorder and then the mental health professional is required to use one of a few approved treatments meant to fix them and get them out the door as quickly as possible.

I really would prefer a system when the wellness helper didn't have to pigeon hole a person first with a diagnosis that could affect him or her the rest of his or her life. Especially when working with children.
01:19 AM on 12/08/2011
This is exactly correct. The DSM-IV TR has numerous non-specific codes, because clinicians have to give an ICD-9 or ICD-10 code to the insurer to get paid. These more vague codes allow those of us who will not give someone an instant label (after a 45 minute initial session) that will follow them for the rest of their lives, so something can be submitted to the insurer for payment.
Often, subsequent providers of mental health services will continue to use previous diagnoses, even if they are incorrect. As you state, they are pigeon holed. I have seen this many times with children, particularly teens. I once raised red flags on a child diagnosed with Oppositional Defiant Disorder after a 20 minute emergency assessment. There was no information available to the clinician on prior history, and, in my opinion, you cannot make this diagnosis without information from parents/guardians, teachers, and anyone else who has daily contact with the child. Initial assessments, emergency and otherwise, should be done carefully and with as non-specific a label as possible. Anyone being questioned by a stranger in an unfamiliar setting under stress, and sometimes duress, can be construed as avoidant, hostile, defensive, and uncooperative. I have numerous other issues with the DSM, but it would take all night to list them all.
01:41 AM on 12/08/2011
I should also add that in my view, the only time behavior becomes "abnormal" is when it causes a self-identified problem with an individuals daily functioning, or is actually or potentially harmful to others. It becomes a more difficult proposition when others perceive behavior as harmful to an individual, but they do not recognize it as such.
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Thinkster
I Think, therefore I POST!
03:41 AM on 12/08/2011
This I can agree with.
10:10 PM on 12/07/2011
psychoanalytic treatments antiquated and unscientific? this is plain wrong. perhaps research before publishing
photo
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
libwingoflibwing
Leftist, Christian, Non-Violent Revolutionary
11:24 PM on 12/07/2011
Cognitive Psychology replaced Behaviorism which outed Psychoanalytic thinking a long, long time ago. Yes, there are still people doing Psychoanalytic work but the consensus in the peer reviewed clinical Psychological community long ago jettisoned Freudian thinking.
04:05 AM on 12/08/2011
try reading 'The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy'. Jonathan Shedler. University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine. Feb-Mar 2010. American Psychologist.Vol 65 no. 2, 98-109

and try not confusing popularity with valid treatments
photo
HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
ConfuciusSay-
Aglets: their purpose is sinister.
11:31 PM on 12/07/2011
Very few professionals still adhere to these philosophies.
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
11:45 PM on 12/07/2011
And the ones who do, do nothing but harm their patients.
09:52 PM on 12/07/2011
Unfortunately there is marked politicization of all the softer social sciences, especially including the psychological aspects of mentality in education and disability.