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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Glory Mooncalled
09:14 AM on 08/03/2012
When you say, "gluten free," do you mean those sugar filled fake bread products or do you mean people who just don't eat flour or people who don't eat grains? As for me, I'm on the SCD diet because I can't digest grains. I never claimed to be a celiac, I have IBS and this fixes the problem 100%. Anyone read that book, "Wheat Belly?" He says 80% of the population can't digest the hybrid dwarf wheat.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
JohnTheMac
Now, why don't you go home and get your shine box?
08:17 AM on 08/03/2012
"It is important if someone thinks they might have celiac disease that they be tested first before they go on the diet.”

ok, but go try it!
I know people who have tried eating Gluten Free, and feel a lot better. When they present their doctors with this info, they face a big dose of humiliation and a condescending attitude.
"Is this something you read on the INTERNET????hmmmmm??" they'll say with an eyeroll.

""We must prevent a possible health problem from becoming a social health problem.""

What would that be, exactly? What's the downside here?
09:18 AM on 08/03/2012
That the makers of all that processed, gluten-filled crap they call "convenience food" may lose money, and then the doctor's portfolios wouldn't be worth as much!
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
KateBlake5
07:57 AM on 08/03/2012
I haven't been able to track it down to either wheat or yeast, but I found that I had bloat and discomfort after having bread products. Pasta is not as painful to digest, but because of the discomfort and the fact that it impeded my day, I am slowly giving up wheat.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Glory Mooncalled
09:15 AM on 08/03/2012
Read the book, "Wheat Belly."
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
KateBlake5
10:33 AM on 08/06/2012
Thank you! I think that's my problem.
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farmilyman
everything is illusion
06:28 AM on 08/03/2012
Wheat causes far more problems than just celiac's disease. Once again the medical establisment is behind the public.
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
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FaunaAndFlora
Daughter of Pan
01:42 AM on 08/03/2012
While my mother, my daughter and myself have never been tested for celiacs, we've found that several chronic conditions are related to a gluten sensitivy. Psoriasis seems to be triggered by wheat gluten... on the hands for mom and baby girl and on the feet for me.

Then there are digestive problems.

Recently, my husband swore off foods that contain gluten because he has migraines, another condition that's associated with wheat gluten. It only took a day or two before he began having very few issues concerning digestion and gas. The migraines seemed to disappear as well... at least until husband went on a gluten binge. A day after the binge, husband was gassy, dour and dealing with a major migraine.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
JohnTheMac
Now, why don't you go home and get your shine box?
08:20 AM on 08/03/2012
How dare you try to take control of your health!
Didn't you see Monty Python's "Meaning of Life" during the Giving Birth chapter?
"You're NOT QUALIFIED"

LOL
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Bill Lagakos
Nutritional Biochemistry and Physiology
01:15 AM on 08/03/2012
“It is important if someone thinks they might have celiac disease that they be tested first before they go on the diet.”
Why? If someone tries the diet and gets better, then GREAT. If they try the diet and nothing changes, then they might still benefit from reducing long-term exposure to potent gluten sources like cereal fibre (http://caloriesproper.com/?p=1032). This article seems to imply there is a major health detriment associated with gluten exclusion; I don’t think this is the case.
04:45 PM on 08/02/2012
people have this misconception in their heads that eating gluten free will make them skinny.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
JohnTheMac
Now, why don't you go home and get your shine box?
08:11 AM on 08/03/2012
I know lots of Celiacs, and I know a lot of people eating gluten free to feel better.
No one I know is eating GF "to get skinny".
Although, with the relative scarcity of GF food, you probably will eat less, and , if you look at the common things people overeat, a lot of them are gone from a GF diet.
11:20 AM on 08/03/2012
so then you agree with me? because I've met people who assume that it will make oyu skinny...
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Glory Mooncalled
09:17 AM on 08/03/2012
I lost 35 pounds after I gave up grains. Grains are sugar. The first thing I realized is that I've been bloated and swollen for years, then I began to loss fat. Eating, "gluten free," products won't help because they're full of sugar and other grains, but cutting that mess out entirely WILL make you skinny.
11:19 AM on 08/03/2012
i know that, but not very many people understand it.
HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
xstevejx
03:34 PM on 08/02/2012
I just hate it when the usually only up to about 5% of people who have 'allergies' to certain foods try to push their problems (gluten, MSG, etc.) on everyone else, making up nonsense why NOBODY should be eating what they can't because it must be inherently bad for you. I saw some lady a while back claiming that EVERYONE would feel better if they avoided gluten, and then there's the people who make bogus claims that things they're allergic to are poisons. I've also seen people get angry in restaurants because workers there don't know every single possible allergen that might be in their food (and discussions about it that go on for 10-15 mins.) -- if a restaurant doesn't CLAIM something is whatever-free and a simple question can't be easily and assuredly answered, then just avoid it rather than berating people for not knowing or not being sure. Yeah, it sucks to have these problems, but don't try to make them everyone's problems.
07:37 PM on 08/02/2012
Yeah it sucks to have these "problems". For a Celiac (like myself) it is not an "allergy" it is an auto immune disease. When I ingest gluten, my body attacks itself - it is a very long and painful process. I am sure you are inconvenienced by this issue - be glad you are NOT Celiac. Please do not bellitle the suffering of those who are.
HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
xstevejx
11:33 PM on 08/02/2012
I was not belittling it. I'm only talking about the instances where those who have such conditions unreasonably make demands upon others because of it. And I'm not saying it's all, or even most or even a large percentage of them that do that.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Glory Mooncalled
09:18 AM on 08/03/2012
Who has the gun to your head making you give up wheat flour?
HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
xstevejx
02:06 AM on 08/04/2012
The people I'm talking about are trying to.
03:28 PM on 08/02/2012
The problem is there are all different levels of gluten sensitivity and the tests do not accurately report this. Saying your full blown celiac or not is just not realistic as there are many shades of grey. This article seems like a food industry sponsored article in order to keep people eating gluten and being sick.
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08:16 PM on 08/02/2012
You would be a medical professional specializing in celiac disease and gluten intolerance?
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
JohnTheMac
Now, why don't you go home and get your shine box?
08:29 AM on 08/03/2012
"You would be a medical professional specializing in celiac disease and gluten intolerance?"

Perhaps he is, perhaps not. Does it matter?
If you're not a medical professional, you can still read articles the medical professionals write:
http://www.medpagetoday.com/AllergyImmunology/Allergy/15972

"Until recently, gluten sensitivity has received little attention in the traditional medical literature, although there is increasing evidence for its presence in patients with various neurological disorders and psychiatric problems," he wrote.
"The study by Ludvigsson and colleagues reinforces the importance of celiac disease as a diagnosis that should be sought by physicians. It also suggests that more attention should be given to the lesser degrees of intestinal inflammation and gluten sensitivity."
12:06 PM on 08/03/2012
There are many many articles like this if you actually care enough to look.
http://www.naturalnews.com/033502_celiac_disease_gulten_intolerance.html
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mlaiuppa
Pres. Sarcasm Society. Like we need your approval.
03:11 PM on 08/02/2012
Is someone wants to eat gluten free, that's fine. I have no more problem with that than with people who choose to be vegetarians or vegans.

I do think that people should be accurately diagnosed so those that do have celiac's disease know and eat accordingly. I had a work colleague that did in fact have celiac's disease and was diagnosed by a licensed physician. When she started following the diet all of the medical issues she had been fighting for years cleared up.

I will say I believe most of the 80% that are needlessly following the gluten free bandwagon are doing so because of suggestions by the media, some of which are here on Huffington Post. I think you know the Dr. I'm speaking of who is always suggesting everyone eat gluten free.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
JohnTheMac
Now, why don't you go home and get your shine box?
08:31 AM on 08/03/2012
What studies do you base this 80% figure on?

Did you just make it up?
This user has chosen to opt out of the Badges program
02:11 PM on 08/03/2012
The article clearly states:

"1.6 million people who do not have celiac disease still follow gluten-free diets. That means that 80 percent of those on a gluten-free diet have not been diagnosed with celiac disease."

Did you just not read the article?
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mlaiuppa
Pres. Sarcasm Society. Like we need your approval.
01:12 AM on 08/04/2012
No.

I used the statistics stated in the article.

You did read the article, didn't you?

Maybe the author is making stuff up. If so, your issue is with him.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Karl Wilder
Chef Stirring The Pot Harlem
03:06 PM on 08/02/2012
I have called it a trend and a fad and been called out for doing so. Thanks for the confirmation.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
klma
03:55 AM on 08/03/2012
I think there is truth to that. These fad diets come and go. In a year or two it will be something else.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
JohnTheMac
Now, why don't you go home and get your shine box?
08:36 AM on 08/03/2012
There was no confirmation of your belief, only a call to get tested.
Yet, people who go to get tested have to jump through a lot of hoops to beg their doctors for the test.
At the end, if the blood test shows a positive, you still need a biopsy to confirm Celiac. The problem then is that if you eliminate Gluten before the testing, the biopsy will show no damage, so you would have to eat Gluten products for some time before the biopsy
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Sal George
Where ever you go, there you are.
12:53 PM on 08/02/2012
Like most issues, the majority don't have it, just want to feel special. As well as spend more than necessary.
02:50 PM on 08/02/2012
There are definitely people that don't have a problem and just eat gluten free to be with the "in crowd" but the fact is articles like this make it seem trivial for people like myself who don't have celiac technically but have a very extreme gluten intolerence. If I have any gluten through cross contamination at a restaurant that claims to cook gluten free or because I didn't pay attention to a label closely enough, I know it. I get terrible stomach pains as well as a rash that I lived with for most of my life on my arms that went away once I figured out it was from gluten reacting poorly in my system. So while I understand people's feelings of how everyone seems to jump on the next and newest bandwagon each time one comes out its not fair to throw this blanket over everyone that you feel falls under it when there are plenty of people who would love to not "feel special" and not have to spend more than necessary for their food.
03:30 PM on 08/02/2012
Exactly, there are all different levels of gluten sensitivity and tests don't report accurately on this.
10:33 AM on 08/03/2012
Yeah - it's so nice to feel 'special'. It's really really excellent to get sick from a crumb of food. It's awesome to not be able to eat pizza when everyone else in my office has it. Why wouldn't everyone choose to be special like this? Are diabetics just being 'special', too?
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Sal George
Where ever you go, there you are.
10:50 AM on 08/03/2012
Obviously you might not be one of the people that just jump on the latest band wagon.

Careful of that chip on your shoulder, it might be gluten.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
sharooni
The patients have overtaken the asylum
12:10 PM on 08/02/2012
This, like the cast-the-net-wide nut allergies that have suddenly appeared, can be characterized largely as narcissistic, prince/princess and the pea maneuvers. Those suffering from the real deals, really suffer. The band-wagon coat-tailing 'look at me' fringe really diss the suffering of those truly allergic. And, they tend to be rude, ill-informed, ignorant, and exceedingly high-maintenance. So much so that stores, such a Whole Foods Market, will cave in against hard fact to cater to their whims to reach their wallets: last Thanksgiving a store here in Texas was sampling prime rib, with a sign prominently displayed and reassuring patrons that the hunk o' prime beef and fat, ka-chinging in at over $30/lb, was "Gluten Free!"
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
JohnTheMac
Now, why don't you go home and get your shine box?
10:11 AM on 08/03/2012
"Those suffering from the real deals, really suffer. "

Please understand, those "narcissist princes and princesses" help those of us with the "real deal" a LOT!
Our daughter was diag'd with Type1 Diabetes at 3, and the next year she was diag'd Celiac. Biopsy showed damage to small intestine.
This was about 5 years ago.
At that time, a Celiac diagnosis meant you had to learn to cook for yourself, and most restaurants were dangerous, even if what you ordered was safe, cross contamination in the kitchen could blow it. We learned to make bread, cookies, etc. Many times, there was just ONE thing , usually something like soy sauce, that could kill an otherwise GF choice. Something like the Prime Beef you mentioned COULD have some sauce containing gluten, so I love seeing the GF signs (with my aging eyes!)
Today, things have improved a million %!
A pizza place nearby has a family member with Celiac, so now they offer GF pizza and pastas. I never would have believed I could sit home and order GF ravioli and pizza, delivered, just a few years ago!
The grocery stores all have a GF section these days, with Udi's breads and rolls and so much more, readily available. Prices have also improved a lot, but still crazy.
With this in mind, I have one thing to say to the "band-wagon coat-tailing 'look at me' fringe really diss the suffering of those truly allergic."...
THANKS!
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
sharooni
The patients have overtaken the asylum
12:18 PM on 08/03/2012
If you feel that they have helped your child, then that is wonderful.  I would , however, like to point out that the pizzeria was motivated to offer GF crust because an owner was diagnosed.  I use and eat Udi's because they are good products - I do not have Celiac.  These are not the situations I am referring to, nor do I believe that they are the ones that have spearheaded the GF drive.  Beef does not contain gluten ... but gravy does.  However, dealing with these people as a chef, especially when they have no clue as to which foods have gluten, and to which nuts they are allergic - generally, peanuts, which are legumes and not nuts - and then they turn around and eat things that do contain the offending item, swearing up and down that those of us who made the foods to begin with don't know what we used to make them with ... these people are the princes and princesses to which I refer.
11:13 AM on 08/02/2012
Many, many people go gluten free without being diagnosed with celiac because it is easier, less expensive, and faster than getting an 'official' celiac diagnoses. The average time for diagnoses for celiac disease is 11 years. Many doctors do not understand the disease, do not know how to test properly for it, and make poor recommendations to patients. It is extremely likely that many of the 80% DO have celiac disease but were never officially diagnosed, as you cannot test for celiac unless the person is currently eating gluten. If you were very sick, gave up gluten, and got better, would you really want to go back to eating it for 3 months just to get a test done that tells you that they shouldn't be eating gluten? Also - it's very, very weird that this article states that "a gluten-free diet is the most common form of treatment" - because a gluten free diet is the ONLY form of treatment for celiac. There is absolutely nothing else you can do to treat the disease except giving up gluten. Some celiacs require additional things, like vitamins or iron supplements, but no other treatment exists. There's no pill, no surgery, no shots - just the diet.