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gizz4mo1
Enjoy life, you only live it once
03:35 PM on 10/24/2012
wow....isnt a student supposed to be supervised or is that not how they do things in Brazil? they might want to start thinking about it....
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Susan Shaffer
watching you...
11:27 PM on 10/24/2012
You think that is why 3 other people are being questioned about this?
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gizz4mo1
Enjoy life, you only live it once
11:49 AM on 10/25/2012
oh im sure that is why, but this is not the first time it has happened....how many times must this occur before they change some things?
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03:19 PM on 10/24/2012
As A nurse I'm not getting how this happened ? A blood drip is plugged into IV line.(and the patient should be closely monitored for re-actions) A coffee/cream bag right next to it?. How was this supposed to be administered -thru a NG tube or feeding tube direct to stomach? At my hospital connections would not be interchangeable.
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Robert Frano
‘Plausible Deniability’: NOT A FAMILY_VALUE!!
03:13 PM on 10/24/2012
Re: "...A Brazilian student nurse is charged with involuntary manslaughter after allegedly injecting coffee, instead of blood, killing her patient..etc." {NY.Daily.News} (Continued)

A more-experienced-(then-me)-paramedic rolled on a classic, '5A/m chset pain, elderly male, turning blue'...
She administered...
‘2-Gm.'s IV-‘push’-Lidocaine…
Ending the ventricular arrhythmia, (bi-geminal P.V.C.’s, a potentially lethal arrythmia), and elderly, heart-attack-patient...
Simultaneously!

….Paramedic units across the earth administer Lidocaine by the olympic-size-swimming pool-full...routinely!

The moral of these 2 war-stories?

...There, (but for the grace of my Deities!!), went I!
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peegan
My mermaid returned to the sea.
04:26 PM on 10/24/2012
But your story was less the paramedic's fault/mistake then the fault of the manufacturers for packaging a medication that had to be diluted in a fashion that it could be mistaken for and used as a direct injection. I don't know what happened in Brazil, but there is a reason the tubes are clear and coffee, even with milk and sugar, looks nothing like blood.
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bestpbx
Warning, insanity dna at work here...
04:57 PM on 10/24/2012
Absolutely! Well said.
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Robert Frano
‘Plausible Deniability’: NOT A FAMILY_VALUE!!
05:30 PM on 10/24/2012
Re: "...was less the paramedic's fault/mistake then the fault of the manufacturers for packaging a medication that had to be diluted in a fashion..." {peegan}

Well...Yes-'N-No...
In most (‘reputable’) medical courses / medication administration training…
The Instructors / Preceptors REALLY ‘fetishize’ medicine-administration-issues!!!

…Repeatedly enforcing a 'standardized’ method so that the practioner, once out in the cold cruel world, (…of trauma, illness, screaming relatives, and ‘ambulance-chasers’, etc.), will ALWAYS prepare a given-medication precisely the same way…

It’s analogous to the cliché: Parris Island D.I.’s and a recruit’s M-14 rifle; (Pardon…my age is showing, L.O.L.!!):
“There are many like her, but…THIS one is mine!”, etc.!!!

I’m retired from E.M.S. since 1997 and I still catch myself reading the instant-popcorn’s label 3 times, (where it says: “place in microwave this side...UP!”), which is one of the lesser habits left over from perhaps 80-100,000 E.M.S. runs…

That noted…
The organization’s vendor packaged ‘2.Gram.Lidocaine’ in the SAME bottle as ‘50.Gram.Dextrose’…’
Which is what (I theorize) my paramedic-acquaintance thought she was administering

The appropriate item was a ‘bristo-jet ‘, (100 MG.’s Lidocaine; different container/injector), and we were all amazed that such an event occurred to someone with as much street time as this medic had…

Aka: the Scary Stuff of which paramedic's nightmares are made
03:12 PM on 10/24/2012
Why was there a drip with coffee and milk there? Or anywhere?
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Robert Frano
‘Plausible Deniability’: NOT A FAMILY_VALUE!!
03:10 PM on 10/24/2012
Re: "...A Brazilian student nurse is charged with involuntary manslaughter after allegedly injecting coffee, instead of blood, killing her patient..etc." {NY.Daily.News}.

I graduated Northeastern.U.'s Paramedic Program circa 1981.
I went on to NYC’s municipal E.M.S….eventually becoming an ‘A.-E.M.T.-4-Paramedic, A.C.L.S.-Preceptor’.

Preceptors teach / make 'newbie’s'...'safe'...

During clinical rotations…
A class mate (allegedly) charmed his RN-Preceptor, who should’ve stood next-to him (like a 'Terminator'), into allowing his (unsupervised) distribution of the noon-I.C.U.-med's…
The preceptor grabbed lunch...

The student read the dose.order:
‘2-GM's Ampicilian, IV-drip, Q-8'...
In trauma centers, Ampicilian is given by the ‘Exxon-Valdeeze’ load, right?

My fellow student administered ‘2-Grams.Aminophylin, (a common ‘paramedic’ medication)…IV-drip, Q-8'!!

Ampicilian is NOT a ‘paramedic’ medication!
It required 8-250mg.-vials / 2-60cc syringes to prepare…
He later noted this seemed an EXTREAMLY ‘odd’ preparation / dosing sequence, but…he administered it!
The IV infiltrated almost immediately…
He restarted the IV…
The post-stroke-patient experienced a 70 pt. B/p.drop…before re-stabilization, over 8-hours!

…The student puckered ALL his orifices;
The preceptor puckered (‘new’) orifices, (allegedly) never-before-encountered-in-human-(RN.Bsn’)-anatomy!!

During incident-review…
6-8 separate med-error-issues were discovered!
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Marcusarilius
Marooned Star Traveler
03:09 PM on 10/24/2012
Some mornings, I could really use this.
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cuoi
I wish everyone happiness.
03:03 PM on 10/24/2012
Don't they label these doggone things??!!
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pokerstarz
Do not allow the eye to fool the mind
05:16 PM on 10/24/2012
they do, but it's in Spanish
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Angela Grom
05:28 PM on 10/24/2012
Lol it's in Portuguese.
02:59 PM on 10/24/2012
Anyone can get confused? Seriously?

I'm pretty sure coffee and blood don't look the same.
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musicmasterno1
Euthanize the dogfighter, not the dog.....
02:52 PM on 10/24/2012
I'd be upset if she put Sanka in my IV tube......otherwise, a nice mild roasted Colombian with a dash of half and half works for me. ;-)
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Dwight Hebert
04:36 PM on 10/24/2012
I suspect the at it was Brazilian coffee.
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musicmasterno1
Euthanize the dogfighter, not the dog.....
08:25 PM on 10/24/2012
It has to be Colombian. I want to smell Juan Valdez' ass......errr.....burro on the beans!
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jingles32
02:51 PM on 10/24/2012
I've been an ICU/recovery room nurse for over 20 years, and I can tell you that NO student nurse, in this country at least, would EVER be allowed to administer a transfusion unsupervised, not even a GN (graduate nurse)! As well, all blood transfusions are labeled in great detail (re: blood type, date, patent's name, etc.), and must be read and cross checked for patient match by two nurses; signed off on by both, before administering.

Having said that, what the heck is a "coffee feed drip!?" Is it labeled too, have a "type?" If by feed tube they mean a gastric feeding tube, that is not inserted into a vein/food supplements not administered via a needle/cath! This story is unbelievable, literally. Sounds more like this "student" was a nursing assistant, as it mentions her "working." Student nurses aren't employed by hospitals!
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bestpbx
Warning, insanity dna at work here...
05:05 PM on 10/24/2012
PLEASE!!!!!! If I am ever in need of a nurse, I hope it is one like you!
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phylliscooper1
still trying to figure it all out - except math
02:49 PM on 10/24/2012
Nurses, student nurses, CNAs, anyone providing patient care are taught to never perform any procedures or administer any medications or treatment modalities when not trained in the procedure or unsure. These principles are drilled into their training. Another principle is that as a patient care provider you are responsible for your own actions.
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J242
Micro-bio? We don't need no stinkin' micro-bio!
03:22 PM on 10/24/2012
Another basic reality is that plasma/blood looks NOTHING like coffee with milk added! This person should be charged with negligent homicide.
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phylliscooper1
still trying to figure it all out - except math
04:52 PM on 10/24/2012
True.
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dmoongo
The Purpurescent Pimpernel
02:46 PM on 10/24/2012
Blood type, OH!
02:46 PM on 10/24/2012
Any one; a young or elderly parent, a child, wife, husband, neighbor, friend; anyone in ANY hospital, outpatient or over night(s) should have an advocate with them at all times.

Over the last few years we have been involved in medical care situations, and have been appalled at some of the attitudes of nursing staff.

Please understand, I have the greatest admiration for nurses. Some have dedicated their lives to help others; and have done a wonderful job. I have witnessed some unselfish actions by nurses in horrific situations, and the professionalism and calmness displayed in saving a life is inspiring.

My cautionary note above is that mistakes can happen. Whether a mistake is made in selecting a nurse employee, or someone who is distracted for some reason. In most professions a mistake is corrected with an eraser, or a change of policy. A nursing mistake can be fatal. Stay with a family member or friend. Ask questions. And the outcome will be better for everyone.

more to come
02:46 PM on 10/24/2012
Thats what you get when you order a "double shot latte"!
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Anonymous Conservative
Cynical atheist.
02:45 PM on 10/24/2012
Not a good way to die.