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12:54 PM on 10/28/2012
I agree the "bless his/her haert" make me want to vomit
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dpkjj
Peace on Earth
02:01 AM on 10/29/2012
I personally prefer " bless his pointed head."
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sailka
honesty, morality, societal concern always
09:42 AM on 10/29/2012
That discriminates against us few actually Pointed Heads! Discrimantion is sinful!
12:43 PM on 10/28/2012
Liked this enough I am going to read the rest in the series :) Some of these I have heard more than others, but I think your analysis of how some "Christian" phrases are really rather unchristian in their usage is spot on.
P.S. I am a Christian, Catholic variety :)
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BeninOakland
Don't tell me you love me. Let me guess.
12:22 PM on 10/28/2012
If you'll pray for me, can I think for you?
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Ortist
11:24 AM on 10/28/2012
One platitude I frequently got after the death and cremation of my husband was "he's in a better place now". For a few weeks I could truthfully tell them he was in the trunk of the Neon. Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed rattling them.
06:37 AM on 10/28/2012
At the end of reading this I must remind myself, that this is what YOU think!
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Cindy Tregan
Proud D.F.H. Lib'rul
10:36 AM on 10/29/2012
It is also what millions of the rest of us think too, Sweetie.
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03:16 AM on 10/28/2012
non christian here. liked the article; it's therapeutic to hear the self-criticism.
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Killermolls44
The night is dark and full of terrors.
11:21 PM on 10/27/2012
Yeah, I don't like the praying for you comment. A snooty woman said that to me in a rude tone. Out of spite is out of spite regardless of words.
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Tom Berndt
09:38 AM on 10/28/2012
Sure, but why did she say that? Were you trying to "save" her?
10:54 PM on 10/27/2012
There are many Christians that are good people with good hearts who are very well meaning. I have had them in my life.
Unfortunately, the cliches in this article are usually said by Christian elitists who are looking down at those whom they feel are inferior to them, including other Christians that do not meet their standards of Christianity.
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1waitasec
theology = opinion based on conjecture, so what?
01:38 PM on 10/28/2012
well of course the unsaved are inferior...
theses cliches are reserved for the saved superior ones...
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FitThinker
Eat. Lift. Think. Repeat
10:36 PM on 10/27/2012
The I'm praying for you comment made me literally laugh out loud! As a non-believer I get told that all the time. It really is "I don't like you so I'm praying you'll be more like me." Lol good list :)
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Doug Flynn
I luv skunks.
12:10 AM on 10/28/2012
My mother has terminal cancer. I was checking in at the nurses' station as I was leaving for the night the last time she was hospitalized. One of the nurses piped up, "We'll keep you mother in our prayers." She was of course assuming that the other nurses prayed too. I responded "I would prefer competent medical treatment." Maybe I am just to sensitive, but it irked me.
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10:48 AM on 10/28/2012
I'm very sorry to hear about your mum Doug. I hope the future will be as good as it can be for her and your family. Your reaction to the nurse's comment is quite understandable and, as an atheist I can sympathise. I once had a nurse changing a dressing (not very competently in fact!) on an injury of mine and as she was doing it she asked me if "I wanted to make friends with Jesus" and my reaction (not vocalised) was exactly the same as yours!
But, having said that, I always try to draw a distinction between Christians who say "I'll pray for you" as a put down, or an expression of their superiority, and those who are making a genuinely heartfelt expression of concern or affection. I have several friends who are Christian and I'm always very touched when they tell me I'm in their prayers.
Once again, my very best wishes for you, your mother and your family in what must be difficult and sad times.
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FitThinker
Eat. Lift. Think. Repeat
12:51 PM on 10/28/2012
To me it's does sound a bit too sensitive, since they only meant to comfort you and weren't trying to convert you. But a hospital is always such a tense place and I can understand not wanting to hear religion in that situation, so I don't blame you lol
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arachne646
Peace with Justice
03:17 AM on 10/28/2012
Sometimes people say it in situations when they are more worried for a person, than AT them, but it's still not a respectful thing to say. I've often asked, "May I pray for you?", but Christian Piatt's suggestions are much better.
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08:33 PM on 10/27/2012
No. I don't. It is simply an expression of wishing the other person well and send them positive energy and if they are splitting hairs over the semantics, they are fools and petty. I have never said I'm praying for someone and meant it as anything other than positive well being for them.
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02:49 PM on 10/28/2012
Still, if you don't know if a person would welcome your prayers, how 'bout not saying it.

If you absolutely know they want to hear it, fire away.
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dpkjj
Peace on Earth
02:05 AM on 10/29/2012
But sometimes you can't know unless you ask. I have friends and family I know would welcome my prayers. I have others that I know would not (they are non-believers. But sometimes I just don't know, so I ask.
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Alex Prior
Abyssum abyssus invocat
08:30 PM on 10/27/2012
The best comeback I've heard was an ex-girlfriend, who on being informed that by a male relative that he would "pray for her" quipped back: "Oh, please don't bother. Pray for wisdom instead. You're more in need than I am." :-)
08:12 PM on 10/27/2012
"So technically all Christians are still Catholic, if you ask me." In your dreams, buddy. You cannot have it both ways. Either you are part of the church Jesus, Our Lord and Savior began at Pentecost and the apostolic traditions passed down from his anointed priests, or you are part of a man-made farce begun at the reformation, which tore out entire books of the bible that did not coincide with this new "faith". Catholic does mean Universal, in the sense that the truth is Universal and available to all; you either accept that truth or you are not Catholic. Easy as that.
07:17 PM on 10/27/2012
One of the questions I get where we live sometimes is "Where do you go to church?" Since I'm Wiccan, my usual response if we're outside is "You're standing in it!" If we're inside, my response becomes, "Every time I step outside, I'm in my church!" I also sometimes tell them that I only set foot in a monotheistic house of worship for three reasons-a wedding, a funeral, or a fire call. Since I'm a volunteer firefighter, that last part usually gets a laugh.

"Are you religious?" is another loaded question. My stock response is, "If you mean Christian, the answer is no. If you mean 'any religion,' then the answer is yes."

I've encountered "I'm praying for you" a couple of times as well, and I politely tell the person offering to do so not to bother-I'm quite happy with my non-Christian religion, thank you very much. Unless they're really snotty about it.

Don't even get me started on when somebody asks me if I've been "saved."
06:47 PM on 10/27/2012
When Christians say "I'll pray for you" the best response is "Thanks, I'll think for you."