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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Ben Estaville
some people are looking forward to the trip
05:11 PM on 02/13/2013
"Popped from the Sea," and I'm lovin' it! NOT!

Now go get me some of those Chicken McNuggets....because I've been Nuggetized with a box of ten that has a picture of eleven.

If it is MacDonald's, then why is it McNuggets?
04:44 PM on 02/13/2013
It is so sustainable that fisheries worldwide are collapsing.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Petra47
A crisp, darling. A crisp.
09:57 PM on 02/13/2013
I'm of the opinion that no amount of fishing is sustainable. We need to wean ourselves off of seafood completely.
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bullskin
Heresy and orthodoxy--equally skeptical of both
01:25 AM on 02/14/2013
No method of food production is sustainable if we continue to grow our own population indefinitely. Any method of food production is sustainable if we choose to limit our population.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
christellar
Without hope, there is no path to change.
04:36 PM on 02/13/2013
The moment I saw MSC on the McDonulds train I knew it was greenwashing. With low "walmart like" prices corners are cut somewhere. More economic smokescreens.

You want sustainable seafood? get it direct (or indirect with minimal 3rd parties) from a fisherman or fish for it yourself
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Just4theHalibut
04:43 PM on 02/13/2013
I like to buy directly from fishermen too, but I caution that is no guarantee of sustainable fishing. You need to acquaint yourself with seasons and size limits. Unfortunately there are some fishermen (like any profession) that will break the law if they think they can do it under the counter (or over the rail).
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
christellar
Without hope, there is no path to change.
04:57 PM on 02/13/2013
great point, screening of the fisherman is a good point I didn't think about.
also: great screen name LOL
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Sal George
Where ever you go, there you are.
04:35 PM on 02/13/2013
To many humans to feed.

Whatever you go for beef, poultry, fish, vegetables, sooner or later you mess up the environment needed to produce them.

Time for a good plague, take down the population as we are doing to everything else.
04:34 PM on 02/13/2013
Like everything govt touches, its going to be much more expensive. Soon Carp will be $15 per pound and you will have to sign a waiver promising you won't fry it in oil or you lose your health insurance.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Just4theHalibut
05:20 PM on 02/13/2013
The certification agencies are private, not government, groups. That is part of the problem, they are competing with each other and won't necessarily come up with the same "grades" for different products, depending on whom they are trying to make happy (consumers or fishing industry or retail sales). Though they seem to agree on the really bad unsustainable fisheries.
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MJ galt
Adapt or Die; there's No Free Lunch
03:34 PM on 02/13/2013
Feeding cities is not sustainable.
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01:26 AM on 02/14/2013
OK nuke the cities. Problem solved.
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MJ galt
Adapt or Die; there's No Free Lunch
01:51 AM on 02/14/2013
Yes, small nukes would be the best energy source for cities, much cleaner than coal.
http://www.npr.org/2013/02/04/170482802/are-mini-reactors-the-future-of-nuclear-power
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Paige Keith
Snarkasm at it's Finest
02:47 PM on 02/13/2013
The only way I can see having truly "sustainable" fish for consumption is to have fish farms for food fishes. Either that, or have the wild fishes on an alternating year harvest system of some sort. We have got to find a way to feed our people without endangering the future of the entire food chain. Ancient farmers were very successful figuring out that if you save some seeds back and plant them (on purpose) you won't completely clean out the wild plants. Same deal with the fishes. We can't force all countries to go along with this type of a plan, but if we do it and they see how well it works for us, they may decide to do it for their country too.
04:31 PM on 02/13/2013
You are basically correct. Land-based fish farms are the only truly sustainable form of fishing. It does carry benefits, although I am not a fan of present day fish farming:

1. It is easily audited to determine the extent of its "sustainability";

2. It is easily controlled from infecting wild stocks;

3. It discourages "fish fraud" at the retail end, as DNA testing, and product tracking is easier.

The fish farms pens in open waters are ghastly, and an abomination, but if the technology for land-based fish farms is effectively pursued we might actually survive as a species for the next hundred years, as will the variety of fish species that we are presently eradicating.
02:43 PM on 02/13/2013
fish is very often swiched with a simular texture and flavored fish but it's way less expensive the most common are grouper, tuna, snapper,and cod the most dangerous is the fich they swap out for tuna I forgett what they call it but it's on the do not eat list due to murcury bad for pregnant women and young children so if your goin to perchase fish go to a trusred fish monger.
04:10 PM on 02/13/2013
Yep, fish fraud. It's been in the news a lot lately. One day the trash fish will be endangered also.
08:04 AM on 02/14/2013
Well alot of the fish the swap out they do for monitary gain not because they're endangered yhe only thing endangered with the sawap is the  cash in their pockets so swap out it is
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SBinF
02:36 PM on 02/13/2013
A few weeks ago, I commented that sustainable seafood was a myth and caught heck for it. I still stand by my assertion. We will probably see the end of many, if not most wild caught species in our lifetime.

Look at what humankind did to the whales. Fish don't stand a chance.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Petra47
A crisp, darling. A crisp.
10:00 PM on 02/13/2013
I agree with you, friend. It's quite sad. I feel like it's a combination of "out of sight, out of mind" and people overestimating the load our oceans can bear. It will be a sad day for us (not to mention ecologically disastrous) when we kill the most diverse ecosystem on the planet.
ThinkCreeps
Seriously, it's time.
01:43 PM on 02/13/2013
More Patagonian toothfish anyone?
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gonzoman
02:09 PM on 02/13/2013
one of the least sustainable fisheries. if there's one fish you should never purchase either at the market or a restaurant patagonian/chilean sea bass is one.
01:00 PM on 02/13/2013
Most comercial fishing destoys tons of sea life as bycatch and mechanical/enviromental destruction. Farmed fish requires even more destruction to to feed them. Go catch 'em if ya wanta eat 'em.
12:35 PM on 02/13/2013
With our appetite for seafood, "Sustainable Seafood" is an oxymoron.
02:18 PM on 02/13/2013
Spot on. The seafood might be "sustainable", but our consumption levels are not.
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plantbasedpunk
live from the PHX
12:22 PM on 02/13/2013
I knew there was something fishy (no pun intended) about McD's getting the MSC certification. At least we know that a.) consumers have a hard time determining what is and isn't sustainable seafood or what that even means and b.) that the majority of the ocean's fish stock are in decline or will be soon. With that in mind, the answer is simple: don't eat seafood! We can grow plenty of food on land, there's no need to tear up the oceans for it. I'm never going to forget seeing satellite photos of fishing trawlers in the pacific. They leave behind hundreds of miles long streaks from where the nets have been dragging on the bottom of the ocean floor tearing up everything in it's path. It's heartbreaking.
04:14 PM on 02/13/2013
For once I agree with you completely! But it helps that I don't care for seafood anyway.
I live on the gulf coast and almost everybody here is crazy for the stuff, I'd rather just dig something outta my garden.
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Molly D
05:10 PM on 02/13/2013
You garden too?
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Just4theHalibut
04:57 PM on 02/13/2013
There is consensus among all certification entities that Alaska pollock (and Pacific cod) are sustainable fisheries. The only disagreement is, at what level. I was surprised at the statement that pollock "is suffering from declining stocks". (A loaded expression that no fisheries scientist would use, and incorrect). The Monterey Bay certification is "acceptable", rather than Best, but MB has incorrect data in its analysis. Pollock is NOT at a 20 year low. And its 2013 Acceptable Biological Catch is higher than it was in 2012.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Meerkatx
12:21 PM on 02/13/2013
How can we trust if the fish we're getting is sustainable since 30% or more of all fish seem to be mislabeled between being caught and ending up on the plate?