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10:35 AM on 06/18/2010
:-(
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HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
iLoveOldNY
What Would George Carlin do?
10:34 AM on 06/18/2010
As far as I understand, the Uzbeks went to Kyrgyzstan and started farming, and the Kyrgyz who are broke are resenting it? Is it classism? Is it a Hutu Tutsi scenario?

Can someone please clue me in with a short, non-politically correct background to this situation?
10:41 AM on 06/18/2010
I'm surprised too--I don't know the history behind this particular animosity--leftover from the breakup of the USSR, I guess. The Uzbeks are great farmers--I'm eating Uzbek cucumbers right this minute. Kyrgyzstan is very mountainous and they have very little industry--maybe you're right about the resentment. We have lots of Uzbeks and Tadjiks here in Siberia who seem to get along fine.
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HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
iLoveOldNY
What Would George Carlin do?
10:56 AM on 06/18/2010
Nothing like being an ex-pat o help you realize how much you have in common with someone you hated back home.

:)
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11:33 AM on 06/18/2010
The Uzbeks have always lived there in the villages and farmed. The Kyrgyz have always lived there in the highlands and raised animals. When Soviet Union drew borders in 1926 and labeling nations like Kyrgyzstan then the Kyrgyz started coming down to villages and cities for government administrative jobs wanting to run "their own" country. After the breakup of Soviet Union the Kyrgyz really came down in droves and took over everything leaving Uzbeks to do retail business only which they did well. The Kyrgyz always disliked Uzbeks elite manners and Uzbeks always disliked Kyrgyz nationalism. Then recently when the Kyrgyz government was toppled for the second time in six years, lack of effective governing caused Kyrgyz locals and bitter former politicians to take it all out on innocent Uzbek population. And that's how it went down.
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HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
iLoveOldNY
What Would George Carlin do?
11:50 AM on 06/18/2010
Thank You!

In one paragraph you told a story HP hasn't been able to tell in a whole page.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Ergon
Man From Atlan
10:09 AM on 06/18/2010
I call on the UN to send a peace making force to protect the Uzbeks and allow them to return to their homes NOW. It is shameful that nothing has been done so far, and that Russia has not been able to assist either.
11:18 AM on 06/18/2010
The UN is too busy obsessing about 9 terror supporters and how to blame Joos for everything.
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
kyeshinka
12:26 PM on 06/18/2010
The Russians have had some experience "dealing" with the problem back in the early 1990s. Not suprisingly they don't want to be there.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
StCuthbert
Anytime the mods are ready...
10:05 AM on 06/18/2010
How awful. Is there anything the UN or US can do to help?
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americawasgreatonce
Life is not fair, get used to it.
11:08 AM on 06/18/2010
Let them take care of it themselves. It is a religious thing.
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HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
iLoveOldNY
What Would George Carlin do?
11:55 AM on 06/18/2010
No. It's not.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Ljilja
http://graciouslivingdaybyday.com/
10:01 AM on 06/18/2010
I am from former Yugoslavia, so I come from the part of the world that many identify with ethnic violence.
I have never understood this need that humans have to hurt each other. All the ethnic groups I have ever known have had good people and bad people in equal measure.

It breaks my heart to see that we never learn, not from history or from each other's suffering.

http://graciouslivingdaybyday.com/
10:48 AM on 06/18/2010
It's an innate need of blaming someone else for our failures.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Johnagain
WTFWJD?
11:39 AM on 06/18/2010
This situation does seem to echo the what happened in former Yugoslavia in many ways. It would seem that a major contributor in both cases is overpopulation relative to economic opportunities. Millions of young, unemployed or underemployed people always seems to lead to violence. Typically between ethnic or religious groups where one seems more prosperous than the other. This happened between the Hutus as Tutsis in Uganda, the Serbs, Croats and Bosnians in Yugoslavia, the ethnic Chinese and Indonesians during their currency meltdown, etc. I would think by now that we could predict where these things are about to happen, and step in preemptively with overwhelming peacekeeping forces until economic conditions can be improved.
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
kyeshinka
09:50 AM on 06/18/2010
This is political, not religious or ethnic. Just like the Bosnian/Serbian conflict of the early 1990s. The mainstream press was almost in unison saying, "These people have hated each other for years." Those who lived there knew the storyline was BS, and the same line is being fed to us again.
In short, Bakiyev is mad he was thrown out of power, and he's going to kill lots of people because he's mad. Money, politics, a sore-loser former president. It's pretty simple actually. The Wall Street journal also details shady business connections in the link below.
http://freedomsyndicate.com/fair0000/wsj00A.html
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americawasgreatonce
Life is not fair, get used to it.
11:09 AM on 06/18/2010
It is a religious thing.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Ergon
Man From Atlan
12:13 PM on 06/18/2010
Did you even read her linked article?
11:17 AM on 06/18/2010
So it's attempted politicide. Does that make it better now?
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
kyeshinka
12:25 PM on 06/18/2010
Yes, that's exactly what I meant. I was totally legitimizing the carnage going on. Thanks! Brilliant!
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Christopher Daley
09:37 AM on 06/18/2010
I will never understand the worlds desire to kill everyone.

www.csdaley.com
09:36 AM on 06/18/2010
Horror.

Why such unrest? Anything to do with the fact that colossal energy reserves are lurking under that bloodied soil--just waiting to be transported via pending Afghanistan pipeline in the name of ungodly profits?
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MajorKong
If the pilot's good, see, I mean if he's reeeally
09:33 AM on 06/18/2010
Do they have oil or a friendly dictator who's willing to let us put a military base there?

Otherwise I don't see us caring.
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09:33 AM on 06/18/2010
Humans are so....chimp-like.

The practice of slaughtering based on bloodlines...is beyond words.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Hard2kill
09:20 AM on 06/18/2010
You want to end this nonsense? Threaten them to drop atomic bomb...
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08:42 AM on 06/18/2010
Quick, send a flotilla!!
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Albert Amato
08:51 AM on 06/18/2010
That was my thought.......but this is Muslim on Muslim violence and the anti-Israel group is strangely silent.
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09:31 AM on 06/18/2010
Currently busy monitoring the outcome of Jew on Jew violence.
09:44 AM on 06/18/2010
I see the Palestine conflict as more of a land conflict. If another group of people show up one day and declare you property to be theirs, you will object no matter what their religion is.
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david5000
Detective & Pilot
08:20 AM on 06/18/2010
We have enough on our plate, let other nations solve their own problems regardless who bad they can be.

You try to help, they jump all over you.

We're out of the business of nation building.
10:32 AM on 06/18/2010
We're not in the business of nation building, but we can successfully be in the business of genocide prevention. Pres Clinton proved that in Kosovo. (And we should have proven that in Rwanda. Missing that opportunity was one of Clinton's biggest regrets.)
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americawasgreatonce
Life is not fair, get used to it.
11:09 AM on 06/18/2010
I disagree, Let them take care of it themselves. It is a religious thing.
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david5000
Detective & Pilot
04:46 AM on 06/19/2010
Looks like we missed the oldest Genocide for over 50 years, in Pal.est.ine.
08:19 AM on 06/18/2010
"She insisted good will between ethnic Kyrgyz and Uzbeks would end hostilities."

How did bad will become so pervasive you could have two thousand dead, a million needing aid, and upwards of four hundred thousand refugees, all in a short amount of time? That sounds like tension longstanding and boiling over, versus something out of the blue or unforeseen.

"Kyrgyz authorities have said the violence was sparked deliberately by associates of Kurmanbek Bakiyev, the president who was toppled in April in a bloody uprising. The U.N. has said the unrest appeared orchestrated but has stopped short of apportioning blame."

It would not be the first time that the perversion of self interest caused widespread suffering (if true).


"Uzbeks interviewed by Associated Press journalists in Osh said that on one street alone, ethnic Kyrgyz men sexually assaulted and beat more than 10 Uzbek women and girls, including some pregnant women and children as young as 12."

Then, there is always the sick and twisted opportunist, who -- under the cover of unrest reveal their resident evil, their latent defects.


Summation, these are the components of past tragedies, or – we have seen this before. You would like to think that at the root of any uprising is a noble cause. Based on the reporting, I see no noble cause, for what is gain by perversion of self interest and being? A few measly trinkets of momentary delusion begetting prolonged pain and sorrow (aggregate) – at best.
10:36 AM on 06/18/2010
You don't need long standing tensions. It's not important that two ethnic groups have centuries of conflict; it's only important to have one of them THINK that they have had centuries of conflict. If a people believe a MYTHOLOGY of victimization, it doesn't matter whether or not they were actually victims.
An aggressive propaganda and organization campaign is sufficient. As with most things in the world, look for the people who profit (in terms of wealth or power) from this conflict. They are the ones paying for the radio time and the salaries of organizers and propagandists.
10:59 AM on 06/18/2010
Hmmm, for a moment there, I placed that model on America and found it did not fit, for surely, here, we agree and can see that the history did victimize modern day inhalers of air.

I can connect with you viewpoint however. But a few questions come to mind.

You say -- "You don't need long standing tensions."
That gets back to my original assertion concerning the numbers. You suggest deadly angst came out of a vacuum of manipulation. I say, you cannot manipulate something that does not exist. Are there people who seek to profit from unrest? Did George Bush illegally invade the sovereign nation of Iraq?

Correct, follow the money and the propaganda paid for by the money.

"If a people believe a MYTHOLOGY of victimization, it doesn't matter whether or not they were actually victims."
What comes to mind is the following: Basis in Fact

Now of course, from a colonialist point of view, colonialism was righteous. But for the people who continue to suffer via the arrogant hand of the dead colonialist, there is no basis in fact for such delusional thinking. See conflict of Kashmir as one example of the proof of this. Posturing Gods of yesterday drew lines in the sand causing strife today, yet there progeny want no dissent, they want dissent to go away. This cannot happen captain, not as long as real blood flows, and real hardship continues, not as long as injustice stands with a mask of purity.
10:38 AM on 06/18/2010
easy hemmingway
11:00 AM on 06/18/2010
hee hee...I was simply speaking as I do.
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07:54 AM on 06/18/2010
Now here's a tragedy I won't ever understand. I mean, I get it that one well-armed clan of some description has decided to murder a different local clan and take all their stuff, but by the time I figure out who's who on the other side of the earth, I'll be in diapers again.
Let's see if the Russians or the Chinese can step up and try to stop mass murder in their own half of the earth. I'll bet they can and if their politicians don't get as odd as ours, they might.