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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Rangergirl
Needs of many outweigh needs of few or one
04:11 PM on 07/27/2010
We better do something and soon... We can't keep our heads in the sand much longer. We will be like Australia. Drinking recycled waste water....from sewage treatment plants.
04:08 PM on 07/27/2010
Time to start looking at all those golf courses in Arizona, heh heh
05:45 PM on 07/27/2010
"Time to start looking at all those golf courses in Arizona, heh heh"

What, you'd put all those illegal aliens who mow the grass out of work? You're a racist!
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Punisher703
Sad But True
04:07 PM on 07/27/2010
In the US, companies like Nestle are bottling up our freshwater and selling it to other countries. The problem with that is the water is not returned to the US water cycle. It results in a net loss of water for the US - corporations are essentially depleting the US freshwater supply for profit.

Additionally millions of gallons of freshwater are being used to support hydraulic fracturing, which is part of the natural gas mining process performed on thousand of wells all over the US. During this process the water is mixed with chemicals, many of which are carcinogenic or other wise harmful to organic life. This toxic soup can get mixed in with the underground freshwater supplies, and can end up in water wells.

The environmental damage these actions collectively cause seem to be even worse than the gulf oil spill, because we don't physically reside in the contaminated gulf. But we all have to drink this ever more contaminated, rapidly depleting freshwater...
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StopThePlanet
Outlaw stupidity and only outlaws will be stupid
04:01 PM on 07/27/2010
This is nothing new. This situation has been known for quite some time. The report commissioned by the DoD in 2003 detailed the problem

http://www.gbn.com/consulting/article_details.php?id=53
03:59 PM on 07/27/2010
Years ago, during the settling of this country there were always fights which broke out over water - or lack thereof.

Today with the growing population's over-use of water, fail to realize that we take water so much for granted that no one gives thought to the fact that climate change - storms and blizzards in the Midwest, rather than in mountains and the north where that water would find it's way into streams and rivers, which then feed the lakes and reservoirs, which in turn feed the towns and cities - is already playing it's part.

I understand that I will be criticized for 'not knowing what I'm talking about' but it has been my theory for many years that the next B.I.G war will be over water - probably globally. Before that the price of water will far exceed the price of gas and it will be the pioneer days all over again - but on a much grander scale!
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HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
fiorastar
03:58 PM on 07/27/2010
It has long been known that water wars will soon replace oil wars, and most developed nations and/or their corporate "owners" have been acting with that in mind for some time.
Nationally, just check out the long standing water issues between Southern California, and what it thinks is it's "natural water supply" in Northern California and Oregon.
05:47 PM on 07/27/2010
Maybe if liberal politicians weren't so worried about protecting fish, farmers in California could get some water for their fields.
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HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
fiorastar
11:55 PM on 07/27/2010
Well, it's not the organic farmers of the Pacific Northwest or the wild salmon and crab fishermen who are responsible for providing water to make your southern CA dry brown desert into GPS controlled mega-machine petrochemical poisoned "farms".

We eat those fish we are protecting, and are trying to make sure they continue to survive for that purpose as well as for our children and their children. We also happen to find that we need those fish, as well as the beautiful clean rivers they swim in and spawn in, for our own income--fishing, tourism, etc.

Oh yeah, being able to drink our local water is also kinda important to us.
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01:56 AM on 07/28/2010
I can prove you are ecologically illiterate after reviewing your posts. Why should your view in this regard be respected?
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mikey09
Living off the grid.
03:58 PM on 07/27/2010
I was thinking on the immigration issue the other day and it hit me...who big a population does the USA want and how many people can we manage on our resources...

Seems we better be putting some real thought to that before we get in the 600 million to a billion ranges...

And one thing abt global warming, what good will it do us to make alot of changes if Mexico or China and India are all going to continue with massive fossil fuels etc..
03:43 PM on 07/27/2010
I live in Texas and started collecting rain water last year because I have so many outside plants to water. A good rain fall I can collect over 300 gallons and my plants do much better with rain water than chlorine water. I plan to increase my storage to at least 600 gallons because I run out of water between rain falls. My water tank is hooked up to a pump. My next step is to hook up a reverse osmosis system for drinking water.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
USAFree1
03:49 PM on 07/27/2010
Good for you. You might consider the reverse osmosis for your plants too. The stuff falling out of the sky is full of all kinds of chemicals and particulates.
04:13 PM on 07/27/2010
I grew up on the Island of Jersey where the ONLY water we had was collected from two flat roofed buildings - our house and garage (there was no public water and we couldn't drill a well) It was funneled into a five thousand gallon underground tank. From there it was pumped back onto the house roof into a holding tank to give water pressure. We never wasted water. We washed our dishes in a dish of soapy water and rinsed them in another dish - and BOTH dishes were used on the garden (the soap protected our veggies from bugs).

During any drought period we had 'bath night'. Four inches of water (heated on the stove) in the tub served the four of us (Dad used the hottest water and I followed him, then my sister and Mother always had the cold tub). But that wasn't the end use of that water. We bailed out the bath tub into buckets and carried the buckets for use on the garden - and since we lived off what we grew - the garden was even more important than our little baths.

I have to agree with you. There is NO water that tastes as good - or is as soft - as rainwater.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
JShankel
I want my country forward
03:42 PM on 07/27/2010
Like for example it might be a good idea to begin investing in large scale cisterns and desal fields if snow packs are going to be diminishing EVEN IF it's all part of a "natural cycle" and is a hoax and conspiracy and going away on its own and not our fault and too late to do anything about it and screw you.

Because the reality is that we kind of rely on water. So it would be good to have some. Hydration isn't a "liberal issue."
03:39 PM on 07/27/2010
Most countries would pool their resources and abilities to overcome this situation............. but not in Glenbeckistan. That would be communism an soshulism. Maybe even Narzyism.
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HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
iskra
Natural enemy of sharks and tro//s
03:37 PM on 07/27/2010
It's okay, most of those are Red states and they don't believe in climate change so there will be no problem.

It's not like they'd be looking for relief or money or help in any way.
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josh h
Keep voting your staight party ticket sheeple
03:40 PM on 07/27/2010
SOCAL gets its water from who?
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
JShankel
I want my country forward
03:43 PM on 07/27/2010
NORCAL
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HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
iskra
Natural enemy of sharks and tro//s
04:25 PM on 07/27/2010
Yes, yes...CA will have it's issues but I see that the term MOST is confusing to you.

Care to list all th states that will be impacted do a count and see if MOST of them are Red states or not?
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03:44 PM on 07/27/2010
Heaven forbid conservatives speak out for conservation.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
DSOTM
Legalize it, now!
03:30 PM on 07/27/2010
So to all you people over 40, L'Chaim
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Glassylady
03:22 PM on 07/27/2010
Underground aquifers provide the bulk of water for farming and living. Check out the Ogallala aquifer, we are depleting it at 8 times the rate of replenishment. It will potentially be gone in a hundred years. This aquifer provides 30% of the irrigation water in the US. Why are we depleting it for crops such as cotton, that no longer have a manufacturing base in our country? We need to be aware of our usage.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Cain Lum
03:28 PM on 07/27/2010
Americans and their government lack the ability to use long term strategies or even formulate them. I wonder how democracy, the very idea people can elect with wisdom people to govern themselves, will fair in a world where resources at are a premium and entire societies need to be mobilized in ONE direction for survival.
HUFFPOST COMMUNITY MODERATOR
carbolaw
03:50 PM on 07/27/2010
Just saw a documentary on the water crisis and the privatization of water around the world. In addition, to farming using up the current aquifers, there are also ridiculous policies that if the farmers do not use the entirety of their water rights each year then they lose their water rights. So if a farmer tries to conserve water, he/she is in essence punished with fewer water rights or even no water rights in the future.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
Cain Lum
03:22 PM on 07/27/2010
It is going to happen much earlier for the American Southwest. The wasteful use of water and the lack of any sort of conservation efforts, even simple things like mandatory rainwater collectors on homes, will lead to a very bad situation much earlier than 2050.

Desalinization is expensive both money and electricity wise. The only efficient way to do it would be through nuclear fission or fusion, and as of right now the latter is still in the realm of "maybe it will work...eventually". The earliest fusion plants right now are predicted to be widely built by nearly the end of the century, which does none of us any good.
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NormalAmericanMan
If we knew anything, we would not be here.
03:29 PM on 07/27/2010
The American SW was a desert before government irrigation programs started in the 30s-50s (think Hoover Dam). I was a desert... it will be again. Can't sustain that which does not happen in nature (given enough time, the human race included). I don't know that I even have a point... which might be my point.
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josh h
Keep voting your staight party ticket sheeple
03:36 PM on 07/27/2010
Is untreated rainwater in the southwest safe to drink? I would think with the smog coming from L.A it would pollute the water as it was falling.
From what I understand simply using salt water as the cooling system in nuclear reactors will actually desalinate it. This seems to me like the easiest solution to both our water and energy needs. We could easily build pipelines to the interior portions of this country to help offset the pumping of our aquifers.
03:15 PM on 07/27/2010
We will have to learn to desalinate ocean water cheaply--or die.
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NormalAmericanMan
If we knew anything, we would not be here.
03:29 PM on 07/27/2010
Plenty of water in space. Colonize space or die.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
USAFree1
03:54 PM on 07/27/2010
Really? Who knew?
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josh h
Keep voting your staight party ticket sheeple
03:37 PM on 07/27/2010
Nuclear power and desalination can go hand in hand. Two birds one stone.