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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
commonsense68130
What did you expect? Plant a potato, get a potato.
08:22 AM on 11/01/2010
Just institute a progressive water bill.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
greysells2
grey cells matter
08:41 AM on 11/01/2010
Like a progressive income tax?
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
commonsense68130
What did you expect? Plant a potato, get a potato.
06:02 PM on 11/01/2010
Exactly, if the desert communities want to have green lawns, they have to pay for them. The larger the lawn, the higher the bill.
08:07 AM on 11/01/2010
Didn't Stewart ask for the end to fear tactics and proclaiming end times?
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
garder54
08:07 AM on 11/01/2010
Many of the cities on the list shouldn't even exist. Establishing a major metropolitan area in a desert is just silly.
It is just common sense that an area can only support X number of people. Shame on these city planners for not realizing thye have reached the maximum sustainable population and continue to believe their cities can grow exponentially without any consequences.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
SaraNader
08:06 AM on 11/01/2010
Many of those cities are in the bible belt -- can't the Hypo-Christian citizenry just pray for water?

Here in the pinko, Commie, tree-huggin, gay-acceptin' Midwest we have too much water! We got it coming up in our basements, runnin' through our streets - God must REALLY love us!
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08:27 AM on 11/01/2010
Wow...someone missed the Rally To Restore Sanity this weekend.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
IndyFem
08:35 AM on 11/01/2010
Los Angeles is hardly part of the "bible-belt."
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born 2b different
research b4 u post
09:16 AM on 11/01/2010
Sara Nader said MANY of the cities are in the bible belt, not ALL the cities.
08:06 AM on 11/01/2010
We can turn our own waste into drinking water. I used to turn salt water into drinking water in the Navy. Once the demand for these tech's becomes greater, the cost will reduce. This is more of an economic annoyance than a real problem.
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
garder54
10:24 AM on 11/01/2010
Turning treated sewage into drinking water is a beaurocratic nightmare being realized by municipalities all over the country.
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WOODSTOCKER51
HAVE A NICE DAY!
08:00 AM on 11/01/2010
.PICTURE THE "NEW NEVADA"...WHERE SHARONM ANGLE WILL HAVE THE WATER TURNED OFF SO NEVADA BECOMES THAT DESERT WASTELAND SHE LONGS FOR.................{THINK OF ALL THE $$ SHE WILL SAVE NEVADIANS!}
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07:46 AM on 11/01/2010
Having water saving devices on toilets and sinks is great but will do very little in the long run. We are over populating the areas that nature is willing sustain, plain and simple. Want to help, stop having children. We need to really seriously look at how many people we have here and slow or completely stop immigration into the country. People really seriously need to understand that you may want another child however the earth can longer support another body.
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sabelmouse
i love to tumble , ask me why .
10:55 AM on 11/01/2010
surely you can have children without having swimming pols, huge lawns or showers that use up hundreds of litres every time. i have 2 children and none of those things.
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02:59 PM on 11/01/2010
So you think having a swimming pool is the equivelent of water use of an actual person over a lifetime? Really?

Fine, you have 2 children who in turn have 2 children, now your little family of 4 has grown into a family of 10, still think that pool uses as much water as 10 people? Now you have 10 people using how much water to shower? Unless of course you're not going shower. How much water does each person need for drinking every day? Showering? Cooking? You're seriously not going to tell me that 2 people use as much water as 10, are you?

If you are going to try and make an argument against population control I would highly suggest you come up with something better than that.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
greysells2
grey cells matter
07:43 AM on 11/01/2010
Golf courses in the desert are obscene. The reason they are there is the land was cheap and the taxpayers are subsidising their water delivery through public water systems. Didja know that a considerable amount of bottled water is purchased from municipalities at a tax payer subsidised bulk rate?
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
garder54
08:07 AM on 11/01/2010
Cities in the desert are obscene!
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
OutAtFirst
Mountain goat, desert rat and sea dog
09:26 AM on 11/01/2010
I guess Cairo, Tehran, Jerusalem, Tripoli, Baghdad, Riyadh, Ulan Baataar, Tuscany and a fair chunk of Mexico just gotta go.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
greysells2
grey cells matter
07:39 AM on 11/01/2010
Have American plumbers install US manufactured low volume high tech toilets. Green jobs.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
IndyFem
08:39 AM on 11/01/2010
Better yet....quit building residences in these areas that require more and more toilets.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
greysells2
grey cells matter
08:44 AM on 11/01/2010
I was thinking of mandatory retrofits.
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Morena
¡Diga toda la verdad. Siempre!
07:03 AM on 11/01/2010
The privatization of US waterways has already started, check the doc Blue Gold. Remember oil was known as 'black gold'? Same players, different industry.

A family we're all familiar with *starts with the letter 'B'* has purchased massive amounts of water supplies in So. America. This is the new frontier.
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07:41 AM on 11/01/2010
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but water companies have been privatized for decades.
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Morena
¡Diga toda la verdad. Siempre!
08:27 AM on 11/01/2010
Who's disagreeing?
07:00 AM on 11/01/2010
Marc Reisner wrote "Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water" in the 1980s, and it was published in 1986. (A four-part television documentary based on the book was shown on PBS in 1997.) I recommended the book to people I knew who wanted to put down roots in the Southwest, in order to let them know how deep those roots would have to go before they would find enough water to sustain them for a generation or two. Reisner's book was and is prophetic, and those of us fortunate enough to live in areas that have ample or abundant water should find a way to get involved in the politics of water to ensure that the water that belongs to all of us does not fall into the hands of corporations with ambitions to form water cartels.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
farmerlady
Blonde, Democratic socialist, and unwilling expat
07:03 AM on 11/01/2010
This is an admirable and sensible sentiment, but do you really think the kind of people who think Palin is a legitimate politician will be able to protect their water supplies?
04:55 AM on 11/05/2010
I'm not sure what Palin has to do with protecting and conserving water. People may delude themselves about the merits of a political pretender, but I don't think it will take much to wake them up to the very real probability of water shortages and the disease and famine that will result.
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sabelmouse
i love to tumble , ask me why .
11:01 AM on 11/01/2010
i found it online. youtube but better that nowt eh? shall watch presently.
http://www.videosurf.com/video/cadillac-desert-1-mulhollands-dream-3-of-9-131480233
04:57 AM on 11/05/2010
Thanks for the link. I'll pass it on to a few friends who have never seen the series.
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06:58 AM on 11/01/2010
You mean to say cities built in the desert are actually running OUT OF WATER? Who could have predicted this?
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
farmerlady
Blonde, Democratic socialist, and unwilling expat
06:46 AM on 11/01/2010
When the private companies are selling us water for $100 a barrel and children are dying of thirst because their parents are poor, we will have earned it because of our mendacity and lack of stewardship of this resource--not to mention our lack of foresight. They're already selling off the Great Lakes, which are 17 feet below normal this year. Give it a generation or two--we're toast.

On that cheerful note, I'm going to go get my coffee.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
farmerlady
Blonde, Democratic socialist, and unwilling expat
06:40 AM on 11/01/2010
This issue is the elephant in the room for America. Huge swathes of the American west were settled and just as in Australia, the Europeans and British who built farms there wanted to live and farm like it was England or northern Europe. Now we have a whole culture of suburbanites who want it to be sunny and never rain and yet they want endless water coming out of the lawn sprinkler. Spoiled much?

It's 200 years later and the party is over. There is nothing anybody can do about it--some of the people can stay if they learn to conserve water carefully and some will have to leave. The desert and the prairies will resume their normal color over time--and guess what, it ain't green. The down side of course is the incredible damage these environments will have sustained.

The human race: they never disappoint as long as you expect the worst.
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HUFFPOST BLOGGER
CarrieAntigua
17°07'N, 61°47'W
06:17 AM on 11/01/2010
Most houses here have cisterns which collect rainwater off the roof...the country has a desalinization plant for it's main water supply. We have serious droughts for a few months of the year and have learned to be conservative in our water usage...
06:46 AM on 11/01/2010
Yes, except in CO, mostly semi-arid grasslands, water law prohibits that cistern idea, not that it isn't a good idea. Every drop that runs off belongs to somebody, as I understand it. Lawns and flower beds that look like Seattle are the main curses, so are golf courses. Native plants, not KY bluegrass or invasive species, conserve water. Then, too, leakage from old water mains wastes zillions of gallons. Most treatment and distribution systems need replacement. Try that after you cut taxes.
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HUFFPOST SUPER USER
farmerlady
Blonde, Democratic socialist, and unwilling expat
06:49 AM on 11/01/2010
Golf courses in Arizona consume a huge amount of water. Meanwhile, the residents are ordered to do without. I've already heard disgruntled residents talk about busting some pipelines late at night in protest.

Water sabotage--the new way to fight the rich?
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07:02 AM on 11/01/2010
Cisterns used to be common in many parts of the US, but current laws prohibit their use. In Europe, "gray water systems" which use rainwater or reuse water from bathing are not uncommon, and are encouraged. In the US, it is largely illegal to attempt such a thing.

The first thing that could be done in the communities mentioned here - and across the nation, as far as I'm concerned - is to enact a total ban on lawn watering. I'm a Master Gardener and I have never given my lawn supplemental water. It looks fine, which is to say it's a solid cover of green stuff. Lawn watering wastes millions of tons of water, and chlorinated water is deadly to essential microbes in the soil.
HUFFPOST SUPER USER
garder54
08:17 AM on 11/01/2010
Beneficial reuse of wastewater is not a largely illegal practice in America. It requires permitting from environmental gov't agencies, but that is it. The PA DEP is actually in the process of permitting a benecifial reuse project that will create a manmade wetland, heat a township building, provide a common tap to a residential development, provide water for a car wash, irrigate a golf course and fill a swimming pool in a local hotel. In the past the state has permitted reuse water for use in toilets.
Here is a link to Pennsylvania's guidance on benecifial reuse. I'm sure many states have the same practices, especially out West.

http://www.elibrary.dep.state.pa.us/dsweb/Get/Document-72495/362-0300-009.pdf