THE BLOG

The Demise of Boston Talk and the Ongoing Collapse of Corporate Radio

01/03/2013 09:04 am ET | Updated Mar 05, 2013

At 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Jim Braude and Margery Eagan signed off for the last time from the morning talk show they had hosted on Boston's WTKK Radio. A few minutes later, the station reemerged as Power 96.9, a faceless entity blasting out robo-music of some sort. And Boston found itself with just one full-time talk radio station.

The demise of WTKK has been portrayed as another nail in the coffin of right-wing talk radio. The estimable D.R. Tucker calls it part of "a downward spiral for a key element of the conservative entertainment complex." And, yes, that's surely part of it.

But what we are really seeing is the demise of commercial radio in general, as corporate owners (Greater Media in WTKK's case) attempt to squeeze the last few nickels of profit out of a medium that may be in its final stage of collapse.

By the end, WTKK wasn't even a right-wing talk station. Braude, a liberal, and Eagan, a moderate, hosted a civil show that was more about entertainment than politics. Moderate politics and humor were the rule during midday. The only right-winger was afternoon host Michael Graham, whose idea of a good time was to make fun of people with dwarfism.

It was a far cry from the days when WTKK's signature host, Jay Severin, would call Al Gore "Al Whore" and refer to Hillary Clinton as "a socialist" and "a pig." Then again, Severin himself was long gone, having made the mistake of joking about sex with interns at a moment when his ratings were falling.

During the 1970s, '80s and '90s, Boston was a terrific town for talk radio, the home of pioneers such as David Brudnoy, Jerry Williams and Gene Burns, among others. Yes, they leaned right, but their approach was intelligent and respectful (OK, Williams often wasn't respectful), and they were immersed in the local scene in a way that few talk-show hosts are these days.

So now we are left with one full-time talk station, WRKO, home to right-wingers Rush Limbaugh and Howie Carr, a local legend whose shtick descended into bitter self-parody years ago. (Limbaugh's syndicated show recently moved back to WRKO from a weak AM station owned by Clear Channel.) It certainly hasn't helped either WTKK or WRKO that their ratings pale in comparison to two full-time sports stations -- a phenomenon that didn't exist during the heyday of local talk.

The only bright light is Dan Rea, who helms a very conservative evening program on all-news station WBZ. Rea, a former television reporter, eschews the shouting and demeaning putdowns in favor of smart conversation.

What happened to talk radio in Boston? I would point to three factors. And I would suggest that none of these are unique to our part of the country. Boston may be on the leading edge, but these same trends could sweep away talk elsewhere, too.

Corporate consolidation. Since the passage of the lamentable Telecommunications Act of 1996, corporations have been buying up radio stations in market after market, transforming what was once a strictly local affair into a bottom-line-obsessed business.

As far back as 1997 I wrote in the Boston Phoenix that the rise of chain ownership would eventually kill local talk. We are now seeing that come to fruition. The automated music stations that are on the rise may not garner many listeners. But they are cheap, which means that their owners can bleed some profits out of them regardless.

"In our current media environment, corporate owners seem to have less tolerance for the station that is unusual, the station with the niche audience," media scholar and radio consultant Donna Halper wrote for my blog, Media Nation, earlier this year. "Part of what makes radio unique as a mass medium is its ability to befriend the listener. So losing a favorite station is much like losing a friend."

The rise of public radio. Boston is home to an exceptionally vibrant public radio scene. Two stations with strong signals -- WBUR and WGBH -- broadcast news, public-affairs and (yes) talk programming all day and night, and enjoy some of the largest audiences in the Boston area. (Disclosure #1: I'm a paid contributor to WGBH's television station.) Other, smaller public stations broadcast far more eclectic musical offerings than anything on commercial radio.

This trend is related to corporate consolidation, as it was the slide in quality on the for-profit side that sent many listeners fleeing to nonprofit radio. If anything, that trend will accelerate.

Technological change. Earlier this year the Phoenix sold the FM signal for its independent rock station, WFNX, to Clear Channel -- but kept streaming online. The Boston Globe, meanwhile, hired a few of the people who were laid off when WFNX left the air and now streams its own indie rock station, RadioBDC. All of a sudden, we've got a war between two local music stations, neither one of which can be heard over the air. (Disclosure #2: I'm an occasional contributor to the Phoenix.)

These days it's not difficult to stream Internet radio in your car, which is where most radio listening takes place. Pandora, Spotify and out-of-town music stations (WWOZ of New Orleans is a favorite of mine) are powerful draws, which gives the local flavor of online stations like RadioBDC and WFNX a considerable edge over computer-programmed corporate radio -- or, for that matter, subscription-based satellite radio.

It is this last development that gives me reason for optimism. Radio has always been held back by the physical limits of the broadcast spectrum. In a world in which those limits don't exist, "radio" stations must compete on the strength of their programming rather than their stranglehold on the AM and FM dials.

Seen in that light, the end of WTKK is just another step on the road toward what may be a brighter, more diverse radio future.