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Are Small Presses the Best Choice for Latino Writers?

05/16/2015 10:20 am ET | Updated May 16, 2016

Recently, I wrote about the dismal publishing scene for Latino authors. Well, I was remiss in at least one aspect. I implied that Hispanic writers are limited only to pitching the big New York publishing houses or jumping into the self-publishing quagmire. There is another option.

Namely, it is the world of small presses. Now, in the past, the phrase "small press" invoked images of ink-stained loners cranking out bizarre manifestos. Well, you'll be glad to know those guys have moved on to troll internet comment pages across the web.

The small presses that exist today are often professionally run, highly principled organizations that focus on marginalized or experimental writers. And when it comes to Latino authors, we may be entering a golden age.

I'm talking about presses like Arte Publico, Floricanto, and Editorial Trance, all of which have been doing great work for years. And there is also Aignos Publishing, co-founded by Jonathan Marcantoni and Zachary Oliver.

Marcantoni says that Aignos, and other small presses that have a similar focus, look for writers who push boundaries and challenge readers to question their worldviews. Authors who embrace their distinct cultures -- something Latino writers are well-known for doing -- may find a home at Aignos or a similar small press.

"A small press gives authors the legitimacy of being affiliated with a company, one that is taken seriously by media and festivals and awards, in a way writers never get as self-published authors," Marcantoni says. "Well-established small presses have marketing plans and publicists, plus the distribution channels are on par with what large presses use."

Indeed, I can speak to this issue, as my own self-published novel, Barrio Imbroglio, is selling somewhere between hot cakes and lukewarm waffles.

It would certainly help to have an established marketing team behind me (my current marketing team consists of me and my cats).

Marcantoni says that when it comes to small presses, "the Latino author gets the best of both worlds: world-class distribution, a company backing their efforts, and creative freedom."

That combo often leads to great books. For example, Aignos recently published Nuno, by Carlos Aleman. The novel is a lyrical love story set in pre-Castro Cuba and the aftermath of the revolution. Marcantoni says that Nuno doesn't fit into mainstream expectations of Latino literature. As such, it lines up with Aignos' mission of pushing writers to develop their views and skills instead of pressuring them to make the bestseller lists.

"No one should be a writer to be famous," Marcantoni says. "It should come from a desire to express yourself and touch the lives of others.

So will we see more Hispanic authors telling their unique stories via small presses, touching the lives of more and more readers? Well, there's ample reason to be optimistic about such a future.

"The Latino community can stand out as one of artists seeking to raise the bar of what storytelling can be," Marcantoni says. "And there are publishers out there who will support you."