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Donald Trump's Hair and the Presidency

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Rumors flew this week that Donald Trump is possibly planning a run for the highest office. Fed up with perceived inefficiency and ineffectiveness in the Oval Office, Trump thinks he might be the best man for the job. No sooner than the reports surfaced did columnists begin to poke fun at The Donald's famous head of hair. Since it's long held that Americans vote at least partially with their eyes -- and demand a head of hair that represents their commander in chief well -- these critics have some ground to stand on. But, The Daily Telegraph's Nigel Farndale warns that in this case it could serve as a distraction:

Imagine if he did become president: he could be telling the world, in a live broadcast from the Oval Office, that he had, on a whim, pre-emptively launched a nuclear strike on Belgium, and no one would pay any attention because we would all be transfixed by his hair.

Farndale may be on to something. Last month, I attended an event where Trump served on a panel discussing the new season of The Apprentice. Before the panel was invited to the stage, the host Paley Center for Media screened portions of the first episode from the new season. Trump, his daughter Ivanka, son Donald Jr., and producer Mark Burnett took seats in the front row, leaving Trump seated directly in front of me in the stadium seating. For the half-hour screening, I found myself staring at Trump's hair.

After careful inspection, I can safely say that Trump's hair is real. Once that controversy had been settled for me, and the panelists took the stage, I was able to focus more on what they had to say about the new season and the show. This season focuses on out-of-work individuals who are looking for a second chance during tough economic times. Trump seemed sincere while discussing the opportunities that he's trying to create for those who have fallen on hard times -- he's even brought in well-known CEOs from outside companies to help advise contestants as they look toward a post-Apprentice future. Through the help of these connections, Trump is trying to better others' lives. During an election season when everyone is saying Americans are voting squarely on jobs and nothing else, Trump is sending the right message.

But this program alone isn't enough to make Trump presidential. Throughout the panel, Trump highlighted Frank A. Bennack, Jr., chief executive of Hearst Corporation, and his wife in the front row for their hard work and dedication to the media industry. When Trump made these gestures, it had the feel of a candidate rising up and giving honor to his supporters.

Trump may not be the right fit for Washington, yet his decades of real estate experience have served him well. He shows the makings of someone who knows what it takes to get noticed and talked about.

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