THE BLOG
06/04/2010 04:01 pm ET | Updated Nov 17, 2011

Worry Dolls: Why Grown Ups Need Them Too

Judith Warner had an interesting article in The New York Times recently. It's called "The Why-Worry Generation" and it's all about Gen-Y: the so-called "millennials" born between 1982 and 2002.

The thrust of the article is that even though these young people ought to be completely stressed out by the economic downturn, joblessness and high levels of debt they are confronting as they enter adulthood, they aren't. They believe in themselves to the point that they are actually willing to wait for the right job to come along -- one that's fulfilling, not just pays the bills. And they believe that they are good enough to get it. In short: they just ... don't worry.

Warner bases her argument on a small group of college grads with whom she conducted interviews. But her findings are borne out by a much larger study carried out by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press earlier this year. Pew also found the millennials to be remarkably hopeful and self-assured.

I read both articles and felt ... anxious. Maybe it's generational and maybe it's just me. But I worry about everything. All the time.

I worry about money. I worry about my career. I worry about whether we'll ever move back to the United States ... or should. I worry about my kids: that they'll be happy and well-adjusted and have lots of friends and never feel sad or lonely or excluded. I worry about my siblings. I worry about missing yoga. I worry about going to yoga. Sometimes I feel that even my worries have worries.

I have a lot of strategies for dealing with my worries. Sometimes I write them down in a little notebook. Sometimes I talk about them with my husband or my close friends or my life coach. Sometimes (she said, with a post-modern twist) I blog about them.

But by far the best remedy against my worries is a little tradition my daughter and I have started of late. As we were moving, I came upon a box of Guatemalan worry dolls that I've had for ages, dating back to when I lived in Central America many moons ago. If you haven't seen worry dolls before, they are these tiny little dolls that come in a small, yellow wooden box. In the folk traditions of Guatemala, children are meant to tell a worry to each doll before they go to bed. In the morning -- so the story goes -- the children wake up and their worries are gone because the dolls have removed them.

Anyway, my daughter and I have built the worry dolls into our nighttime routine. Every night -- just before she goes to sleep -- we run through our joint worries, taking turns as we make our way through the dolls. What's interesting is how repetitive our worries are. My daughter always worries that she'll "have a bad day" and "won't like her lunch." I always worry that I'll "be stressed out" and "not get enough done." Then we put the dolls in the box and close it with the lid.

It doesn't always work. But there's something deeply soothing about naming your worries out loud and then putting them in a box. It's like a friend of mine who once cut out a picture of her ex-boyfriend and then stuck it in a bottle. The physical act of putting the proverbial "lid on it" really does help.

Added bonus? The whole process has reminded me of that great Dire Straits song "Why Worry."

Have a listen.