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Six Ways to Keep Your Cool When You've Been Burned

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MANAGE CONFLICT

Have you ever felt angry and didn't want to speak to someone ever again for hurting your feelings? It's a common scenario: someone says something that's rude, wrongly accuses us of doing something wrong, or in some other way makes us get reactive or defensive.

This can take us to the point where we most certainly don't want to wish them well. But does harboring dislike, revenge, even hate, do us any favors? Does it really make us feel better in the long run or does it just get us more stressed?

It's definitely important that we acknowledge what we are feeling -- all the anger, unfairness, and aversion -- and really honor how hurt we are. Repressing our feelings means they'll most likely just come up again at some point, probably when another situation triggers a similar response.

Negative emotions can sap our energy, especially when we hold on to them. They spread like wildfire, soon affecting our behavior and attitudes towards other people, like a single match that can burn down an entire forest.

And they create an emotional bond with the abuser that keeps our feelings alive, replaying the drama and conflict over in our heads, justifying our own behavior and disregarding theirs. In the process we may become a not-very-nice person.

Anger, aggression and bitterness are like thieves in the night who steal our ability to love and care. Is it possible to turn that negativity around and chill out so we can wish our abuser well, without necessarily needing to know them as a friend again? This may sound absurd and challenging but it can make life's difficulties far more tolerable. How can we do this?

  1. Recognize no one harms another unless they are in pain themselves. Ever noticed how, when you're in a good mood, it's hard for you to harm or hurt anything? You may even take the time to get an insect out of the sink. But if you're stressed or in a bad mood, think of how easy it is to simply wash it down the drain.
  2. No one can hurt you unless you let them. Hard to believe, as no one actually wants to be hurt, but it's true. When someone hurts us, we are inadvertently letting them have an emotional hold over us. Instead, as spiritual teacher Byron Katie often says: If someone yells at you, let them yell, it makes them happy!
  3. Respect yourself enough that you want to feel good. Deb did this with her father, who was an abusive and angry man. She made the decision that she wouldn't respond to him with negativity, so she turned it around within herself and continued to wish him well. He died recently and Deb was able to feel total closure.
  4. Consider how you may have contributed to the situation. It's all too easy to point fingers and blame the perpetrator but no difficulty is entirely one-sided. So contemplate your piece in the dialogue or what you may have done to add fuel to the fire. Even when he feels he is 100 percent right, Ed always looks at a difficulty to see what was his part in it.
  5. Extend kindness. That doesn't mean you're like a doormat that lets others trample all over you while you just lie there and take it. But it does mean letting go of negativity sooner than you might have done before and, as challenging as it may be, replacing it with compassion. Like an oyster that may not like that irritating grain of sand in its shell, yet manages to transform the irritation into a beautiful and precious pearl.
  6. Meditate. Meditation takes the heat out of things and helps you cool off, so you don't over react. A daily practice we use is where we focus on a person we may be having difficulty with or is having a difficulty with us. We hold them in our hearts and say: May you be well! May you be happy! May all things go well for you!

How do you deal with someone who has hurt you? Can you see how to bring more kindness into your life? Do comment below.

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