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This Tiny Detail Will Make You Miss Snape Even More

R.I.P. Alan Rickman.

01/14/2016 01:29 pm ET
Warner Bros.
We'll miss you, Snape.

Farewell, sweet Half-Blood Prince.

Snape was always one of the most divisive characters in Harry Potter and still causes a riddikulus amount of debate online, but now that Alan Rickman, the actor who played him in the film adaptations, has died, it makes us reflect on all the things we love about Snape. And there's one tiny detail that'll make you miss him even more.

This particular Easter egg first popped up a few years ago and has been floating around the Internet like Hermione hit it with Wingardium Leviosa, but it seems appropriate to revisit.

Snape is, of course, revealed in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to have been secretly looking out for The Boy Who Lived all along due to his never-ending love of Harry's mother, Lily. It was a big twist in the story, but it turns out author J.K. Rowling may have actually revealed it the very first time Harry meets Snape

Image: Tumblr

The first question Snape asks Harry is, "Tell me, what would I get if I added powdered root of asphodel to an infusion of wormwood?" It seems innocuous enough, but Tumblr user tomhiddles explains it actually has a secret meaning:

According to Victorian Flower Language, asphodel is a type of lily meaning ‘My regrets follow you to the grave’ and wormwood means ‘absence’ and also typically symbolized bitter sorrow. If you combined that, it meant ‘I bitterly regret Lily’s death’.

Yup. For someone who was double-crossing the Dark Lord, Snape is apparently terrible at keeping a secret. Redditor TedTheGreek_Atheos interprets the phrase to mean, "On Lily's grave, I promise to protect you." But either way, it's clear the Potions master gave everything away right from the beginning.

Was it an intentional message to Harry? Or was J.K. Rowling just throwing in an Easter egg for her readers? Whatever the reason, it does make us miss Professor Snape even more.

Just remember he'll never really be gone. Not as long as those who remain are loyal to him.

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