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Ayala Laufer-Cahana, M.D.

Does Restaurant Food Raise Blood Pressure?

Ayala Laufer-Cahana, M.D. | April 16, 2015 | Healthy Living
It is possible to eat healthy when eating out -- but it certainly isn't easy. Tempting foods, countless choices and large portions are just some of the reasons we'll tend to overdo it when eating out. The fast food to healthy food restaurant ratio definitely also skews to the greasy, salty, sugary side of things.
William E. Klunk, M.D., Ph.D.

For Most People With Alzheimer's, Ignorance Is Not Bliss

William E. Klunk, M.D., Ph.D. | April 15, 2015 | Healthy Living
Only when the vast majority of medical professionals choose to be forthright about the disclosure of Alzheimer's, will we all begin to see and understand the disease from the same point of view. As the stigma fades away, as it once did with cancer, we will step up our efforts to raise awareness, care for our loved ones and ultimately find a cure.
David A. Grimes

Medical Misogyny: Kansas Mandates Substandard Abortion Care

David A. Grimes | April 14, 2015 | Politics
SB 95 is an unwarranted and dangerous intrusion into the patient-physician relationship. The bill provides no medical or public health justification for outlawing the safest method of second-trimester abortion in the world today. Thus, one must conclude that the intent is to punish women by relegating them to obsolete care.
Linda P. Fried

Understanding the Science Behind Childhood Obesity

Linda P. Fried | April 13, 2015 | Science
Brand-new research reveals that whether a child is normal weight, overweight, or obese at age 5 is hugely indicative of weight at age 50. If a child is obese at age 9, the correlation is even greater; at age 15, it's still worse. This extraordinary finding means that trajectories of weight gain starting at age 5 can be linked through ages 9 and 15 all the way to middle age.
John Geyman

Why the Private Health Insurance Industry Has to Go

John Geyman | April 9, 2015 | Politics
One can argue that the private insurance industry should be regarded as obsolete and not worth saving. However, the ACA has extended its life, including almost $2 trillion in federal subsidies over the next ten years.
Jalees Rehman, M.D.

African-Americans Receive Heart Transplants at Hospitals With Poor Performance Track Records

Jalees Rehman, M.D. | April 8, 2015 | Healthy Living
So how do patients decide where to have their heart transplants performed? And wouldn't a person who needs a heart transplant choose to go to a top center? Quality is obviously a major factor. But there is another big consideration in deciding where to get a transplant: accessibility.
Ovey Yeung

Things I Learned While Recovering From a Brain Injury

Ovey Yeung | April 8, 2015 | Canada British Columbia
Despite what the doctors call a "life long recovery," I am determined to move past the incident and accept it as a past.
Wray Herbert

Choosing Sadness: The Irony of Depression

Wray Herbert | April 8, 2015 | Science
My depressed friend wanted relief from his misery, sometimes desperately. He struggled, yet ironically, he often acted in ways that maintained -- rather than alleviated -- his misery. Apparently he's not alone in this sad choice.
Ronald A. DePinho, M.D

Missed Opportunity: What If We Raised the Minimum Age to Buy Tobacco Products?

Ronald A. DePinho, M.D | April 7, 2015 | Healthy Living
This is my call to action for all Americans: It may take years to see the full impact of our efforts, but we must act now to protect public health and target the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, tobacco.
Gregory Sorensen

Two Events, One Lesson: Increase Federal Support for Cancer Research

Gregory Sorensen | April 7, 2015 | Politics
In 2014, NIH research funding for cancer was $56 million less than it was in 2010. This means we now have to fight for increased funding at a time when potentially monumental breakthroughs are in our grasp. In the war against cancer we've had to open up a second front.
Mount Sinai Health System

Should You Get Screened for Oral Cancer?

Mount Sinai Health System | April 7, 2015 | Healthy Living
About 40,000 Americans will be diagnosed this year with oral cancer, a form of head and neck cancer found inside the mouth, including on the tongue, floor of the mouth, and cheeks. Oral cancer can be deadly; historically, the cure rates for oral cancers diagnosed in advanced stages have been very low. That's why finding them early is so important.
David Katz, M.D.

Diet? I'll Have What He's Having!

David Katz, M.D. | April 7, 2015 | Healthy Living
For those who don't know, that's really what the whole Blue Zones idea is about: a characterization of the lifestyle, behaviors, culture and environment of those populations around the world that live the longest and the best. They have the most vitality and the least chronic disease.
Gregory Sorenson

Two Events, One Lesson: Increase Federal Support for Cancer Research

Gregory Sorenson | April 7, 2015 | Politics
In 2014, NIH research funding for cancer was $56 million less than it was in 2010. This means we now have to fight for increased funding at a time when potentially monumental breakthroughs are in our grasp. In the war against cancer we've had to open up a second front.
Arianna Huffington

My Q and A With Cognitive Neuroscientist Anjan Chatterjee

Arianna Huffington | April 6, 2015 | Healthy Living
Anjan Chatterjee is a neurologist and cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of The Aesthetic Brain: How We Evolved to Desire Beauty and Enjoy Art. In answer to my questions, he shared his insights on cosmetic neurology, the potential of so-called smart drugs to harm our health and our sleep quality, and the habits that are truly good for our brains.
Dr. Julio Montaner

In Canada, We Have the Strategy and the Tools to End AIDS

Dr. Julio Montaner | April 7, 2015 | Canada British Columbia
Once the worse affected province, B.C.'s HIV burden today is way below the Canadian average. In Canada, we can lead the way forward towards ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic, but a federal level commitment is sorely lacking.
Howard Fillit, MD

An Alzheimer's Treatment on the Horizon?

Howard Fillit, MD | April 3, 2015 | Science
Biogen Inc.'s recent revelation of promising early data from an experimental Alzheimer's treatment is something of a breakthrough: it's the first time that we have seen positive human data about a new Alzheimer's drug that can both reduce the presence of amyloid plaques in the brain and improve cognitive function.
Sarah O'Leary

How to Save Money on Your Prescription Drugs

Sarah O'Leary | April 6, 2015 | Money
Savvy consumers can save on their prescription drugs by asking the right questions and shopping around.
Arianna Huffington

My Q and A With Rakesh Bhattacharjee, an Expert in Children's Sleep Medicine

Arianna Huffington | April 3, 2015 | Healthy Living
Rakesh Bhattacharjee is an assistant professor of pediatrics at The University of Chicago's Divisions of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine. In answer to my questions, he shared his insights on the link between breathing and sleep health, social factors that can affect children's sleep, and the importance of teaching your children healthy sleep habits.
Alex Tolbert

4 Last-Minute Tax Tips to Maximize Your Health Care Savings

Alex Tolbert | April 2, 2015 | Politics
Tax Day, which falls on April 15, is just around the corner, and if you find yourself among the masses of last-minute filers, here are four tips that will help you maximize your health care savings.
Khushboo Thadani

6 Ways To Upgrade Your Morning Routine

Khushboo Thadani | April 1, 2015 | India
A healthy morning almost always guarantees a healthier day. Even if you are more of a "night owl", there's no reason why you can't make your mornings count. A few tweaks are enough to upgrade your morning routine to help you achieve a healthier, more energised and determined version of yourself... even before you head out to work.
All posts from 04.16.2015 < 04.15.2015