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Heather Taylor-Miesle

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Day One

Posted: 05/24/2012 1:13 pm

Recently Mitt Romney rolled out two new ads touting what he plans to do on his first day on the job if elected president. Both are filled with some lofty goals, to say the least, with the scariest part being that he may actually believe he can accomplish all these tasks on day one.

For the sake of time, I will set aside the ad mentions of overturning the Affordable Care Act and introducing tax cuts/reforms and just focus on two of the big hitters, approving Keystone Pipeline and repealing job killing regulations.

In the midst of all the pomp and circumstance of the inaugural activities, these ads want us to believe that Mitt Romney will make approving the Keystone Pipeline and the repeal of regulations his top priorities. So even with all the other issues facing our country, he's going to make building a pipeline that transports dirty tar sands oil from Canada, through highly sensitive areas of our country, to the already endangered Gulf Coast his first act as president? And as his next act he will repeal all the regulations he deems job killers? Will there be any regard for considering that some regulations are good, can actually create jobs and are meant to keep us safe? And the really pressing question, will this be before or after he picks out his power tie and presidential cufflinks for his ceremonial walk down Pennsylvania Avenue?

On one hand, these ads are hard to believe and can probably just be chalked up to campaign rhetoric and the willingness to make promises, which probably can't be kept (especially since Congress doesn't care about "Day One" or "Day Three Hundred"). In fact, the only way he could probably make this kind of promise happen is if he pays for it to become a reality.

The scary thing is that he could. These ads could be plausible because Romney is seeking counsel from the likes of Harold Hamm. Hamm, who serves as Romney's top energy advisor, is the billionaire chairman and CEO of Continental Resources. And, just one month after assuming his role as energy advisor, contributed nearly $1 million to the pro-Romney super PAC. Raising legitimate questions about his influence with candidate Romney and how those ties could benefit his company.

The saying goes, "You are who you associate with." For Mitt Romney this seems to be not only true, but could become our reality if he is given a day one.

 

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