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Eric Hutchinson's Pure Fiction

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It was one of those brutal New York City winter nights this past January when I met up with Eric Hutchinson at the Monkey Bar in midtown. He was sitting alone in a booth towards the front across from the bar dressed in a high-collar, blue zippered sweater and jeans, his hair a little longer, his face a little thinner. He looked relaxed, confident; as if he had shed the excess from his life and work. Ella Fitzgerald played softly on the jukebox. An elderly couple chatted at the far corner. Hutchinson ordered a Scotch, neat. I had my obligatory Hendricks and tonic, two limes, lots of ice. I had come to find out what was behind the songs I had lived with for two weeks on a first mix of his new album, which he would title, Pure Fiction.

"It's called Pure Fiction, because when I finished writing the songs that would end up on this album and started looking them over, I noticed that none of them were about me," Hutchinson began. "When I took myself out of the way, I wrote about something else. But then I thought anything that comes from me on some level is about me. I still wrote it, I still made it; it came from somewhere, and I think on this album I tried not to get in the way of that as much. If I wrote a lyric, maybe at some time earlier I would have thought this is too cheesy or this is too simple, but this time I said, 'I wrote it for a reason and I don't want to get in the way of what I'm writing it for.' I tried really hard this time around to not screw with stuff more than it needed to be. And I enjoyed that process."

Hutchinson's first two studio albums brimmed with the kind of hooks, choruses and clever lyrics an ascendant star needs to make on his way to the firmament, but he was now without a label for the first time in years. He recently released a set of live songs from his last tour, Almost Solo in NYC, which featured his deftly humorous storytelling as much his considerable musical talents, but decided it was time to trim the whole thing way down, get back to what put him in the discussion with the industry's hottest new talent in the first place.

"You get a lot of good things from being involved with a major label system like exposure I never would have gotten," says Hutchinson. "But the other side of it is it's almost never on my timeline. The last album took a long time, partially it was me, but partially because once it was done there was a lot of stuff out of my control. My mantra on this album was 'I want to make it, I want to put it out, and I don't want anything to be between that.' I wanted that control."

Released from music-biz trappings, the 33 year-old singer/songwriter returned to his roots; back to his apartment, back to the guitar, and reconnected with his adoration for the well-constructed song -- tearing it down and building it back up, one note at a time.

"I sat at in my home studio asking, 'Can I play this song on the guitar? Can I make this song work?' recalls Hutchinson. "Because it's not about hiding behind tricks, it's about 'Is this a song when it's broken down to its bare basics -- is it a song or not? Is it tangible?' I would be at the piano or guitar and just play it as hard as I could and just sort of sing and leave the recorder going and for twenty minutes maybe bang on the piano as hard as I could, smash the guitar, totally sing guttural. Then, leave it alone. Go back the next day and see what jumps out from that, what works."

Much of this primal, stripped down style is clearly evident in each track of Pure Fiction; a truly masterful presentation of Hutchinson's acute pop sensibilities. In fact, Pure Fiction is Hutchinson's elegy to pop music, his raison d'être, a place to fit all those melodies that are so comforting in their immediate hook you'd swear you've heard them before. The album's first single, "Tell The World" is a wonderfully crafted sing-along and a striking prologue to the album's underlying theme -- holding onto our moments and shamelessly shouting it from a mountain top.

"I found myself in the worst place a writer can be, which was happy," he chuckled to himself. "I live in New York, I'm married, I've got a dog -- I've got a nice life...and when I sat down to write this time I didn't feel like emptying the chest all over again and having to dig out my problems. And I became aware midway through that there's a lot of that in there anyway, but I kind of felt it was thematically working and I didn't try and go away from it when it was clear I wanted to keep saying it. It's also a little bit about 'I'm in a great place, but doesn't everyone always hate you when you're in a great place?'"

To hear Hutchinson explain it "Tell The World" is less joyous romp than social commentary on how everything that ends up on Facebook and Instagram reflects only our best moments in life, however there is a great joy in the song, especially the vocal, which is as infectious as anything he has committed to a track. His experience with achieving a measure of stardom and accepting his good fortune without trepidation infuse Pure Fiction with a feel-good vibe, something he found while traveling the country on tour and experiencing life outside the bubble of New York, where he lives, but mostly seeing the world for leisure.

"I put up this inspiration board right in front of me at my workspace when I was playing piano or guitar and singing into the mic," effuses Hutchinson. "I was actually thinking about what I am looking at when I'm working. This method took me back to Barcelona, when I went to visit the Joan Miró museum and I was in heaven. The whole city is amazing. It's so beautiful. And his stuff was so beautiful I immediately thought, 'Should I be looking at something that pleases me when I'm writing; would it bring something out?'"

The "inspiration wall" can be heard in the nearest Hutchinson has come to a ballad, "Sun Goes Down"; his "Dock of the Bay" moment, mixing a haunting melody with striking lyrical imagery. "I got this postcard and just described what was on it," says Hutchinson; the postcard as metaphor for the captured moments of Pure Fiction: "On the front a desert sky orange, red and brown/ She wrote will you think of me/When the sun goes down."

"I guess the more places you go, the more you realize the same things matter to everybody," he says, smiling.

We ordered another round as the room began to fill and the background banter reverberated. Hutchinson made sure I understood the spiritual center of Pure Fiction which is infused in tracks like "Love Like You", an achingly infectious song with a tension that draws the listener to the lyric through an almost hypnotic vocal performance, mixing Beatles bop with the velvet strains of Al Green. But it is in the juxtaposition of subtle duplicitous lines like "This is a crash landing, we're living a dream", which hint at Hutchinson's playful seduction of how much happiness is the result of blind chance.

But it was anything but blind chance when Hutchinson entered the studio last summer, where he constructed the songs meticulously, showcasing an array of rhythms for flavor -- South African, bosa nova, four-on-the-floor rock and slap-back funk -- giving personality to dance numbers like "I Got The Feelin' Now", "A Little More" and "I Don't Love U". Wrapping the tracks in airtight tempo allowed his dexterous vocal lifts and twists to breathe inside percussion. "I tried really hard to not get in the way of these songs," says Hutchinson. "I usually agonize over a certain chord progression or lyric, but this time I just let it happen. I stopped wondering what it was or where any of it came from."

To complete the cycle back to basics, Hutchinson worked on Pure Fiction in L.A. at the late Elliott Smith's humble studio on Van Nuys Boulevard where he recorded his debut, Sounds Like This in 2008. Under the tutelage of two producers, Jerrod Bettis, (Adele, Better Than Ezra, Backstreet Boys) who played much of the accompanying instruments, and Aben Eubanks (Kelly Clarkson) he opened his mind to new recording techniques , but remained dedicated to my description of him when we first met in 2006; songsmith.

"It's that attention to detail all the way across, where every single thing matters, which could also be the unraveling as you get close to the end of the album," Hutchinson says, laughing. "In the old days you get the whole band together and figure out later what the hell that sounded like -- did the bass player play the right thing or not -- but to me that's the whole thing; we get the drums down, and then I get the acoustic guitar, and I make sure the acoustic guitar works and then Jarred picks up the bass and I say, 'Well, that's great, but that part could have gone there.' It's the only way I know how to make music."

New found professional freedom, a comfort in knowing his place in the music biz and a masterfully crafted pop album has Eric Hutchinson right where he wants to be. "I've been doing this for how many years, but whenever anyone asks me, 'What kind of music do you play?' it's like the first time it's ever been asked. I never have an answer, you know? And on the last album I was chasing this thing that I'm a soul artist and the show reflected that on some level, but I think after making this album, I can answer people; I make pop music. This is pop music, and I think this show will reflect that a little more. The last show was little more like a soul review and I think this will be a little more pop, whatever that is? I guess we'll figure that out. Yeah, these songs are pop. I'm a pop artist."

Perhaps the strongest musical statement on Pure Fiction is "Forever", a collaboration with The 88's Keith Slettedahl, a first. It is a master's course in dynamic ranges; from the massaged acoustic open to the lilting lead vocal as prologue to chest-caving bass drum kicks, all of it bedding the wash of harmonies that appear as if a choir. It evokes the best of the British New Romantics period seeped in a New York club milieu. "I was trying to get out of my head space, and for me, that meant co-writing with someone else for the very first time," says Hutchinson. "For the first time I can listen and kind of say it's not mine. I can appreciate all that he contributed to it. Talk about getting out of your own way, I was completely out of it, because it was his thing, and I came to love it more than anything I could come up with."

When we parted, well over an hour of coming to grips with this crossroads album of his, and where it will lead him, he assured me that just speaking aloud its intentions brought to light all the hard work it took to realize Pure Fiction. But doubtless it will be more well-defined this time around.

"My manager (Dave Morris) is obsessed with the idea of how many artists finally figure it out by their third album; Springsteen, Billy Joel, their first albums are not the ones people talk about, they don't have the hits on them," says Hutchinson. "But to me, I think, the third album was about figuring it out. The first one was just gut level, raw, had to get it out there, the second album was over-thinking it all, and this one is me tinkering and learning from those two and changing it up a little bit."