THE BLOG
08/06/2013 08:51 am ET Updated Oct 06, 2013

Hot Off the Press

Screenshot 2013-08-05 at 6.25.08 PM

Some quick thoughts on Jeff Bezos' purchase of the Washington Post:

A reporter asked me whether his purchase was "an act of philanthropy." Probably yes, but I hope it is much more than that. I am glad Bezos is using his wealth to save a great and necessary American institution. But I hope and pray the real value he brings is his entrepreneurship, his innovation, his experience, and his fresh perspective, enabling him to reimagine news as an enterprise.

I'm ready for folks to cry for joy that Bezos knows how to sell content. He'll know how to build pay walls, damnit! But I don't think that's his key value here. He knows how to sell and deliver unique content -- entertainment, mostly -- rather than commodity content, news.

No, Bezos' key competence is in building relationships. This is wishful thinking on my part, as I have been arguing that we in journalism need to stop thinking of ourselves as manufacturers of a mass commodity called content and start understanding that we are in a service business whose real outcome is informed individuals and communities. Thus we must be in the relationship business.

I have been arguing with newspapers lately that they must gather small data about their individual users -- where they live, where they work, what their key interests are -- so they can serve people with greater relevance and value. I hope that skill -- building profiles and using them to improve relevance -- is the first that Bezos brings to the Post.

I have one fear of Bezos: his secrecy. A news organization must be open (there I'm a disciple of the Guardian's Alan Rusbridger). I also want to see innovation and experimentation at the Post done in the open so the rest of the industry can benefit from it. Then perhaps Bezos can save more than one newspaper.

I do trust the Bezos understands the value of the Post and the necessity of journalism's eternal verities. I also trust that Don Graham would not have sold his family's jewel to anyone who did not understand that.

Now mind you, Bezos also invested in Henry Blodget's Business Insider. I'm a fan of Henry and what he has done there, but he is controversial in the halls of journalism schools. Bezos praises the Post for waiting to get things right. Henry is rather quicker on the trigger. I'm glad Bezos has an interest in both models; I think each can learn from the other.

Bottom line: I'm hopeful.

I am left with tremendous admiration for Don Graham, whose family not only built the Washington Post into its glory and protected it from political pressure to serve the people. Don Graham made no doubt the toughest and bravest decision of his life: He admitted that he did not have the strategy to save his newspaper so he found someone he believes will. That takes courage.