iOS app Android app More

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors
Jeff Jarvis

GET UPDATES FROM Jeff Jarvis
 

Life Without Mediation

Posted: 08/25/2012 9:43 am

The shooting near the Empire State Building demonstrated in yet more ways how news will arrive without mediation.

On Twitter, some objected to my linking to photos from the scene taken by witnesses immediately after the crime, without warning of their graphic nature. The alleged murder victim lay in his blood, so bright red that someone else on Twitter wondered whether the image had been doctored. No, we're simply not accustomed to seeing so much blood so fresh. We have waited until news photographers arrived, until after the bodies have been taken away, replaced by chalk outlines behind yellow ribbons with only dried, brown-red stains remaining. We are used to seeing the sometimes ugly world packaged and sanitized for our protection by media.

So it's doubly shocking, perhaps, when media now shows such images from those witnesses.

Jim Romenesko asked The Times about running that photo on its home page, albeit briefly, and they gave what I'd call a right answer: "It is an extremely graphic image and we understand why many people found it jarring. Our editorial judgment is that it is a newsworthy photograph that shows the result and impact of a public act of violence."


I say it is a good thing that we see a more unvarnished world. Perhaps then we'll have a real debate about guns the way we were forced to face Vietnam through scenes of death on the evening news, as some of my defenders on Twitter pointed out. "Death by gunshot is graphic. Now uncontainable," said the Guardian's Charles Arthur (though the Guardian tried to contain it)

I also say that in any case, we'd best get used to it, for as we all well know, news and images of it won't come from reporters and credentialed photographers first and won't be filtered through media before it comes to us. It is coming from witnesses who go by names like @yoassman [the name and a Seinfeld tribute, no doubt] and Mr. Mookie, who may write indelicate comments like, "They shoot, aw made you look. No really tho. Dude got popped!" and "Why yall keep saying it could be someone I know? I don't have anymore room for RIP tatts on my arm. I've seen my friends with they heads blown off in the street. Yea it happens to me too and I get over it. Its life."

Yeah, welcome to life. Most such life isn't reported with such a splash because it doesn't happen in such a public place. It happens in the Bronx or 19 times in a weekend in Chicago.

I think we've become much too accustomed to mediated news, to a world sanitized for our protection. That's what makes people ask for warnings before being shown reality, even if the discussion is about murder, and even if they had to click on a link to see what I was writing about. They had to be curious enough to do that. But they weren't curious enough to see news as it really happened. The image didn't come into their homes on a TV screen with kids on the couch. It came through my Twitter feed. It was insensitive of me to link to it without warning, I was told. No, I think the problem is that media have made us insensitive -- desensitized would be the cliché -- to such a fact.

Don't tell me you're offended by murder. If you weren't, that would be the problem. Of course, you are. So don't tell me not to offend you with what it looks like once you click. And don't tell me what to say and what not to say.

A man was killed in New York this morning. Now we know better what that looks like. That is news.

* MORE: On the Media tells the story of that photo on The Times homepage. And here's Poynter on the photo.

 

Follow Jeff Jarvis on Twitter: www.twitter.com/jeffjarvis

FOLLOW MEDIA