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Who Says Our Way Is the Right Way?

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As I sit on the board of Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, I have been thinking about the different ways people learn. RFB&D gives students the tools to learn by listening. We call that a disability. I think it may soon be seen as an advantage.

A group of Danish academics say we are passing through the other side of what they wonderfully call the Gutenberg Parenthesis, leaving the structured, serial, permanent, authored, controlled era of text and returning, perhaps, to what came before the press: a time when communication and content cross, when process dominates product, when knowledge is distributed by people passing it around, when we remix it along the way, when we are more oral and aural.

That's what makes me think that RFB&D's clients may end up with a leg up. They understand better than the textually oriented among us how to learn through hearing. Rather than being seen as the people who need extra help, perhaps they will be in the position to give the rest of us help.

And I thought that as I read Matt Richtel's piece in the New York Times today, "Growing Up Digital, Wired for Distraction." It starts off lamenting that a student got only 43 pages through Cat's Cradle. But as @HowardOwens responded on Twitter: "Gee, a 17-year-old only gets 43 pages into his summer reading assignment. Like, that's never happened before."

Richtel and the experts he calls blame technology, of course, for shortening our attention spans, just as Nick Carr and Andrew Keen do, lamenting the change. But the assumption they all make is that the way we used to do it is the right way. What if, as I said in Short Attention Span Theater (aka Twitter), we're evolving:

"Maybe the issue isn't that we're too distracted to read but that reading can finally catch up with how our brains really work."

Richtel, to his credit, focuses at the end of his piece on a distracted student who can, indeed, focus -- not on the books he's assigned but on the video he's making. Maybe that's because he's creating. Maybe it's because he's working with tools that give him feedback. Maybe it's because he is communicating with an audience.

I spend time on this topic in my next book, Public Parts (when I can concentrate on writing it -- that is, when I'm not blogging and tweeting as I am right now): Technology brings change; change brings fear and retrenchment. Gutenberg scholar Elizabeth Eisenstein reminds us that for 50 years after the invention of the press, we continued to put old wine in this new cask, replicating scribal fonts, content, and models. That's what's happening now: We are trying to fit our old world into the new one that is emerging. We're assuming the old way is the right way.

Mind you, one of the joys of writing this book is that I've had cause to start reading books again. I'll confess I'd fallen off the shelf.

Now I'm enjoying reading books as part of the process of creating, sharing, communicating. I'm learning not just by reading and absorbing but by rethinking and remixing. And I'm thinking the result of my next project after this one may not be a book but something else -- a talk, for example; a book may be a byproduct rather than the goal.

So is this new generation distracted or advanced? How can they best learn? How can they teach? What tools can we use today besides books? What new opportunities do all their tools present? That's what educators should be asking. That's the discussion I'd like to see the Times start.

@SivaVaid(hyanathan) just said on Twitter: "There are no wires in the human mind. So it can't be 'rewired' Get a grip." Right. What can be rewired are media and education and that's what we're seeing happen -- or what we should be seeing happen.