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Marriage Equality V. Religious Freedom: Ready, Set, Go!

06/29/2015 11:09 am ET | Updated Jun 29, 2016

Marriage Equality is now the law of the land. Finally, each marriage in this country will be protected and afforded the equal opportunities, rights and benefits they deserve. No government will be allowed to stand in the path of those who wish to marry. For those who have known the trauma and hardship it has taken to advance to this day, it is, indeed, a day worthy of robust celebration

Marriage is after all, a celebration that aches to be shared with as many people as possible. The joy of love (if you've ever been so fortunate to have been there) is an experience that you want to blissfully shout out from the mountaintops. Yet, the deepest bond of love asks for more from those would-be partners. It longs for commitment, patience and reliable presence through all of life's ups and downs in ways more substantial than mere romance affords. Knowing this, we long to make ceremony of our intentions publicly. If one looks to the "traditional format" of a wedding, it is the act of standing before our highest powers and saying "I am here for my Love, above all others, and will be held responsible for my commitment." The witnesses to this act not only verify the union and encourage accountability of the betrothed, but also stand in a place of honor to assist in the protection of that union. It is an act of equal commitment from friends, family and community that says, "I will help you succeed together."

That we now have a government standing along side us as an honored witness and protector for our marriages will only strengthen our wider community's understanding and LGBTQ acceptance.

Still, many will disagree we should be celebrating. Cue, the religious objectors. Cue those who think strong communities are better separate than equal. Cue those who cannot fathom life without prescribed gender roles and static sexual orientation. Cue the onslaught of "Christianity is under attack" speech and Religious Freedom Reformation Acts.

As momentous as Marriage Equality is, expect to see more, not less, religious pushback. Expect to see more discriminating business owners citing religious objection. Expect louder, fearful cries from ecclesiastics who have never, on their darkest days, have ever been forced to marry anyone they didn't want to. Expect to hear more agonizingly hateful sermons proclaiming "end times" and "abominations". Expect to continue to hear more quotes from GOP candidates and Christian Conservatives on the "true" definition of marriage, religious freedom and rights of conscience.

And if you can, in the midst of all that, rejoice. Rejoice by celebrating your freedom to marry. There will be clergy there to unite you. Families by your side. And finally, the rights and protections afforded you equally by your government.

Pardon me, Justice Roberts, but you're damn right I'm going to celebrate. In our history, the LGBTQ community has gone from being targeted enemies of the state (you think I'm exaggerating?) to, finally, being protected by it. Pardon me, if for a moment, I take the religious cries that "the sky is falling" to be a bit melodramatic.

Religious freedoms, so far as the eye can see, have been well tested, judged and protected in this country. In fact, we've spent ample time clarifying the bounds of where religion has it's rule in a pluralized society so much so that ordinary, individual citizens have had to labor to define themselves apart from it. Believe me, Jesus is going to be just fine.

To faith communities already in the swing of Marriage Equality, having long embraced the LGBTQ community, thank you for your efforts. Were it not for your willingness to marry, support and bless these unions, we may well been relegated to "civil unions." That being said, we still have a very long way to go.

Christianity is still synonymous with being anti-gay and there are many who expend great effort to color God that way. If the Church feels any kind of pressure at all over this decision, it should be in living up to its own expectations of peace. By continuing to side with theologies untenable to preserving human dignity, religious objections become impotent to their proclaimed higher calling of compassionate life. The rite of marriage is an act of unity and preservation. It is a coming together. A fusing of spirit. By standing together as any witness, we stand together in community saying, "I wish you peace. I wish you all happiness. I will fight for you toward success. I will comfort you in trouble. I am by your side."

It's time, Church. It's time to be a gift-giver rather than a wedge. It's time to make peace instead of starting a new fight.

How many more times, I wonder, will the high court of our nation have to remind us to treat others as we wish to be treated ourselves? It is a lofty ideal we aspire to, fail quite often, rarely arrive at without leadership instructing us to do so, but upon occasion in history, we are find we are capable of more than we might have imagined. Ready? Set...Go!