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Jon Chattman

Jon Chattman

Posted: January 18, 2011 08:20 AM

Long before he started a social network, was sued by friends, had a Golden Globe-winning movie made about him, and became Time magazine's Person of the Year, Mark Zuckerberg was just an ordinary kid with extraordinary baseball skills. At nine years of age, the eventual Harvard grad smashed 23 hits in just 25 at bats for a little league team in his native Dobbs Ferry, NY. While it's unclear whatever became of his baseball skills (Aaron Sorkin skipped it in his Social Network screenplay), one man remembers that one magical season.

Allie Tarantino was Zuckerberg's counselor at a Westchester County day camp the summer after he smashed little league pitching. In an interview last week, Tarantino, now an elementary school teacher, remembered the pre-entrepreneur Zuckerberg as a quirky, fun kid who made a strong connection with him before connecting millions over the world.

"He was one of those kids you remembered," Tarantino said. He made such a lasting impression on Tarantino back in 1993 that he actually had his then-camper autograph his little league card. He still has it today. "I'm a collector. I hold onto everything," he explained.

I asked Tarantino if he knew something the rest of the camp didn't by holding onto the card for some 17-plus years, and asked him if he's curious about what this rare card is worth. To get down to the latter, I visited a Westchester baseball card store called American Legends to see how much a signed card from the Palo Alto dynamo could be worth today. What would you do with this card? Watch below. Like. Comment. Share.

Part One

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