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2 Mammoth Fitness Character Traits That Can Guarantee Your Success in Anything

04/13/2015 01:53 pm ET | Updated Jun 13, 2015

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Photo Credit: JeremyHall via Compfight cc

"Follow this plan and incinerate the fat in four weeks."

"Go on my 15-day plan and buy these supplements and watch the weight slide off effortlessly."

"Do this one trick and quit your job and drink mojitos on the beach."

Do this plan. Do that plan. Actually, do this one now.

One person tells you to do this and the other tells you to do another thing -- next thing you know, you're confused and decide not to do anything.

But, before you get weighed down by countless fitness decisions, diets, and training plans -- make sure you're approaching the situation from a sustainable standpoint.

In life, we need to take chances. Show some intestinal fortitude to stick with our plans, even when progress is slow, or when we don't have a cheerleading squad telling us we're doing good, or when people are telling us to quit.

Before wasting money on the latest "business secret" or "fitness secret," you need to become systemic and relentless toward your goals.

Van Gogh was obsessed and relentless with his craft even without notoriety and a flock of followers. Jackson Pollock was relentless about his craft, which over time led to him producing better work. Michael Jackson didn't become who he was without developing a systemic and relentless approach toward his music.

No matter if you're chasing a fitness goal, writing goal, business goal, relationship goal, or anything -- you must be systemic and relentless with your approach.

What is being systemic and relentless about

Being relentless and systemic with our approaches to fitness and life begins in our heads. Becoming relentless and systemic leads to a more efficient life and higher probability that we'll accomplish whatever we set out to accomplish.

Becoming Systemic

What you do on a regular basis is the foundation of your systemic approach. What you consume, do, and think on a daily basis ultimately shapes who you're becoming.

If you're filling up your daily tank with junk information and food -- then expect your life to be a manifestation of that intake.

Whatever you do, your system's bread and butter is run by consistency. Small daily progress adds up to major results. Improving 1 percent a day leads to a total reinvention of yourself in 6 months. One page a day adds up to a book at the end of the year. One pound a week delivers a hot and sizzling body in six months.

Being systemic is about being in the present moment, which is ultimately all that we can control. Being systemic is focusing on winning one day at a time.

You're aware of the big goal in mind, but you understand that it won't come to fruition in one graceful sweeping motion.

Becoming Relentless

Being relentless is about displaying persistence.

Going after anything of worth stretches us outside our comfort zones, which requires us to become resilient, equip some steel fortitude, and display some determination.

Your workouts will be challenging. Temptation will be all around you as you watch your friends knock back some beers, feast on a platter of wings with some fries on the side. You'll feel distractions when trying to create meaningful work and feel the resistances tugging you. You will curse and be flustered with your goals at times.

After all, fitness is tough and creating a remarkable life isn't a piece of cake.

When approaching your goals, don't treat them like someone who goes on dates with people that they can only tolerate and feel "meh" with.

Treat your goals like you're going out with the person of your dreams.

How bad do you want it? Are you in this for the long haul or just hanging around pretending until stuff hits the fan?

Being relentless is not accepting "no" for an answer when someone tells us something is impossible or to be realistic. Being relentless is not using genetics, work, or friends for excuses toward our fitness goals.

Once you are relentless, you develop a sense of invincibility with your goals.

No matter what happens, you're still going to be around -- fighting and going after your dreams and goals no matter the challenges presented along the way. No one will stop you and giving up isn't an option.

How to be systemic and relentless during a setback

Setbacks are bound to happen. Unexpected challenges will arise. You might even question yourself at times and ponder are you making the right decisions. While we can't control the uncontrollable, we can control our responses and approach to those situations.

Here are 4 steps I use to bounce back from a temporary setback.

1. Face the reality of the situation -- Fitness goals, writing goals, business deals, and even relationships are tough as hell at times, but facing "Captain Truth" is necessary.

Without addressing the elephant in the room, you can't move forward with your goals. Before addressing my self-worth issues, I couldn't move forward in business, creating, nor with my relationships.

Trying to place temporary solutions on the matter only makes the situation worse. Trying to cover food guilt issues by never eating out with friends isn't solving the core issue.

Face the truth and it shall set you free.

2. Keep working -- Whether it's a failed business. Maxed out credit cards (I know this story.) A huge setback with your fitness goals. A creative project that plummeted down the toilet. Accept the pain and whatever feeling that it's currently causing you.

Just as clouds pass by during our days -- this pain and terrible feeling passes by eventually. It might not be a day, or a week, but instead a month. But, know that this moment eventually goes away. This moment won't define you for the rest of your life.

Let it hurt for a hour or two, but then get back to work doing something -- anything!

Start something new, even if it's just an idea in a journal, a new food, or a new 15-minute workout to bring back the good vibes.

3. Take a breather -- After you've gotten yourself back in the positive direction by taking a small action -- go do something not relatable to whatever was causing you grief or pain.

You could do a myriad of things such as: Go out and dance (my favorite), go on a date, read a book, take yourself on an artist's adventurer's date, meet friends -- just get away from ground zero.

4. Have inspiration nearby -- Just as a simple hello can help turn someone's day around, a small piece of positivity can work wonders as well.

Have some inspiring quotes that hang on your fridge. Have a friend whom you can confide in when times are rough. Have your "why" somewhere easily visible to remind you why you're trying to accomplish this goal of yours.

Why you can't rely on external metrics to drive you to success, you can seek external help when you need a pick me up. Everyone at one point or another, needs someone or something to lean on.

Julian Hayes II writes at The Art of Fitness & Life, where he leads a community of remarkable individuals to make a dent in the universe while leveling up their fitness. To get started on the path toward remarkability & improving your health, download his free course & materials.

This article was originally published at http://theartoffitnessandlife.com/