THE BLOG
12/14/2012 04:24 pm ET Updated Feb 13, 2013

Who Benefits From Modern Slavery? You Do

Wait, what? In just two minutes, you will learn how slavery touches your life and what you can do about it. Watch this quick video about human trafficking and the Global Freedom Center. Then take action.

The facts are grim. Right now, 27 million people are enslaved around the world. They are in mines in the Democratic Republic of Congo, fishing vessels off the coast of New Zealand, garment factories in Jordan, the forests of Brazil, carpet factories in Nepal, agricultural fields of Florida, and everywhere in between. That means that slavery is happening across the globe and it ends up in your home. It could be the jewelry you're wearing, the shrimp you had for dinner, the shoes on your feet, the phone in your pocket, or the Christmas decorations adorning your tree.

Now step out the door into your neighborhood. Men, women, and children are held in domestic servitude; forced or sold into prostitution; and coerced into laboring in restaurants, janitorial services and other workplaces.

What many thought was either abolished or happening a world away from home, is closer than you think. Human trafficking is everywhere, touching everyone.

More bad news. Of the 27 million people enslaved, last year just 42,000 were identified -- that's less than 1 percent. Why? Until you know about it and know the signs to look for, human trafficking can remain hidden in plain sight. That means there are too many missed opportunities to identify a trafficked person. At least 27 million missed opportunities.

The Global Freedom Center wants you to be ready for them. Our 5/20 Campaign is training 5 million professionals by the year 2020 to identify and prevent human trafficking. We want you to be one of them, and to help us bring training to your organization or company.

Contact us to schedule training. Download a free ebook so that you know the signs. Share this video with friends and family. Give what you can - so that we can shrink that wide gap between the 27 million enslaved and the 42,000 identified.