THE BLOG

What Is Your Story - and Is It Holding You Back?

02/24/2015 05:16 pm ET | Updated Apr 26, 2015

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I recently delivered a keynote address at our Haute Highlights Women's Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico. I've been asked to write about what I shared.

We all have stories. You probably know your own by heart - those few rehearsed sentences that explain how you've ended up where you are in life. We hone our answers a bit every time, and after a while, we begin to believe that the version we share with others is the real truth about our journey. But far too often, those rehearsed fragments which explain away our choices, that cover up our mistakes, disappointments, failures. The gloss of our public rendition allows us to hide from the real truths that have shaped our journey. By the same token, we can color the way we forever view our own journey by the way we choose to frame the story about any given experience. If we focus on the negative, we may miss the bigger truths. And that's the real tragedy, because it isn't until we explore the reasons we tell the stories we do that we can begin to understand how our stories may be coloring the way we see ourselves and may be the very thing holding us back from what we really want.

Everything Is Ruined


Made with Repix (http://repix.it)One of the first times I discovered my very young daughter might become a talented artist was when I entered her room as she applied her own finishing touches to our marriage license. It would never, ever look the same. I wasn't even sure it was legal now with all the damage to it. (It is. No one gets out of their marriage vows that easy.) For days, I sulked. I felt angry at my daughter for ruining such an important piece of our history. And then, in a moment of clarity, I realized this new version was better. Does anything scream married quite like a first-born's scribbles all over the license? By simply reframing how I perceived the experience, something that was devastating was transformed into what remains as one of my favorite memories.

At My Age


IMG_3548-EditOne of the youngest applicants for HauteHopes, Alissa Chavez, started her company after an 8th grade science fair project. When Jessica Eaves Mathews and I launched HauteHopes, our goal was to establish a nonprofit scholarship fund for disadvantaged women entrepreneurs. But when Alissa applied, it took me by surprise. She'd gained national visibility - including being featured in Glamour Magazine, and had run a successful crowdfunding campaign. She didn't seem like the kind of entrepreneur who would facing disadvantages which were significant enough to prevent her from bringing a viable business to life. But because of her age - despite her drive, vision, intelligence and technical capabilities - she couldn't find an investor willing to take a chance on a teenage girl. Alissa recently joined our ten other finalists on stage at our first benefit gala where each finalist had 90 seconds to pitch their business concept to the audience as well as judges that included a congresswoman, a commissioner, and J. Kelly Hoey, the highly influential and powerful networker and angel investor based in New York City. Not only did Alissa land as the judges' top choice, but she was named the audience choice as well.

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Oh, and the most inspiring part of this story? Another of the scholarship winners chosen by the judges has also faced the same struggle with age - but on the opposite end of her journey. Already in her sixties, Judith Costello is banking her years of experience as an art therapist and artist to finally launch her dream - a destination art experience for couples, families, children, the elderly. Age should never be the story we use to hold ourselves back - or to allow others to hold us back.

I'm Not Qualified


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When I first founded APPCityLife, I worried that others might not take me seriously. I wasn't an engineer, I didn't come from the tech world, and this was my first startup. As time passed, and my company gained its first few customers and employees, I grew more comfortable with my story of inadequacy. "I am unqualified for everything I do," I'd say, rather proud of that fact. I was proud of what I'd created despite the disadvantages I'd faced, and I thought this story perfectly summed that up. But recently I realized my statement wasn't one of empowerment at all; it was a safety net. If my company failed, well, who could blame me? I wasn't qualified, after all. And if it succeeded, I was right up there with miracle makers. I don't say that about myself anymore, because the truth is that I am very qualified for what I do. I've learned every skill I've needed and have grown to fill whatever the role has demanded. Funny enough, since my new story leaves no room for anything less than all-in, I'm not only happier but I've grown so much more comfortable in my role.

What is your story? Do you have one that just might be holding you back? Your story is your own. It's not someone else's, so don't let them decide the words to yours. Be sure you don't allow anyone else's story to define yours. So often we give our power away and hang our happiness or success on the balance of someone else's story. But mostly, just remember that our stories are not written in stone. Look at your situation, and if the way you see your life is holding you back, choose a different view. Find a way to frame your story that empowers you, lifts you up, and gives you the strength and courage to go all in. It's worth it.