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Men Feel Bad Around Smart, Successful Women

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You know all those badass ladies out there that are inexplicably single? Well, maybe it's not so inexplicable.

In a study contending for most-depressing-research-of-the-year, psychologists Kate Ratliff and Shigehiro Oishi tested how a romantic partner's success or failure affects the self-esteem of people in heterosexual relationships. The short story: men feel bad about themselves when good things happen to their female partners.  Women's self-esteem is unaffected.  Here's some of the data.

The vertical axis represents self-esteem. In this experiment, respondents were told that their partner scored high on a test of intelligence ("positive feedback") or low ("negative feedback").

The leftmost bars show that men who were told that their partners were smart reported significantly lower self-esteem than those who heard that their partners weren't so smart.

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In the second condition, respondents were asked to imagine a partner's success or failure.  Doing so had no effect on women's self-esteem (rightmost bars).  For men, however, imagining their partners' success made them feel bad about themselves, whereas imagining their failure made them feel good.

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The various experiments were conducted with American and Dutch college students as well as a diverse Internet sample.  The findings were consistent across populations and were particularly surprising in the context of the Netherlands, which is generally believed to be more gender egalitarian.

We've got a long way to go.

Originally posted at Sociological Images.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the principle writer for Sociological Images. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

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