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The Most Important Gay Porn Film Ever Made?

Posted: 07/11/2012 5:59 pm

WARNING: This piece contains graphic sexual language. Reader discretion is advised.

The annual Folsom Street Fair in San Francisco is noted for its unbridled embrace of every star in our sexual constellation. Even the fearless leather community, which founded the event, can sometimes appear tame amidst the outlandish kinks and clothing -- and lack thereof -- on display along the city's tilted streets.

In the fall of 2003, in the middle of this rowdy bacchanalia, Paul Morris stood at the booth for Treasure Island Media (TIM), the gay porn outfit he founded that featured unprotected sex (barebacking) between its actors. This particular specialty was the singular driving force behind his smashingly successful and relatively new company.

2012-07-09-DawsonJesseOToole2003edit.jpgThen, like the legend of Lana Turner fortuitously cozying up to the counter at Schwab's, a beautiful and achingly masculine young man approached the TIM booth. He liked the TIM videos -- he liked them very much indeed -- and he hoped to one day document a few fantasies of his own. TIM star Jesse O'Toole was on hand, and someone snapped a photograph of the two of them together (right). In it, the grinning young man with a leather cap appears to have found his long-lost tribe, and O'Toole looks as if he has found a seven-course meal.

The photo was sent to Max Sohl, a sometime porn actor with a theater background whom Morris had commissioned to conceive and direct what would be Sohl's first porn film. Sohl met with the aspiring model and asked him to complete a form that included a simple question: "What is one of your fantasy scenes?" In response, the young man wrote simply, "Me getting nailed and seeded by a gang of hot guys."

"The Black Party was coming," Sohl explained in a recent interview, referring to the annual New York City weekend of leather men, parties, and sexual adventures, "and I thought, 'OK, let's see how many men he can take.'"

And that is how Dawson's 20 Load Weekend was born.

Prior to the onset of AIDS, condom usage in gay pornography was nonexistent -- but that was before bodily fluids became synonymous with death and disease. For well over a decade after the crisis began, gay porn videos not only featured tightly wrapped penises, but their storylines -- indeed, the actors themselves -- suffered from a sort of dramatic malaise, as if sleepwalking through their sexual routine while trying to pay no attention to the man with KS lesions behind the curtain. The videos mirrored our own lack of interest in gallivanting about with the pizza man or diving into an orgy with strangers, with or without condoms. Many viewers simply returned to their stash of pre-AIDS pornography, which was condom-less but "justified."

As AIDS deaths subsided with the advent of new medications in 1996, gay male culture responded with a vengeance. Circuit parties were born of celebration (before succumbing to their own excesses), safer sex behaviors relaxed, and there was a palpable longing to escape the horrors of the previous years. Reclaiming a bold sexuality, something many gay men believed had been lost forever, was a tonic for the post-traumatic stress they suffered. Younger gay men, who had listened to stories of an earlier, sexually liberated time as if it were a lost era of paleontology, were more than willing to explore whatever modern version might await them.

Unprotected sex since the arrival of HIV is nothing new (it is, after all, the primary reason for new infections that have continued fairly steadily since AIDS began), but in the late 1990s the gay community proved again how comically adept it is at applying a little branding to any phenomenon, and "barebacking" entered the public lexicon. The irony may be that a new word was developed for the oldest sexual activity imaginable: having sex without a barrier. It wasn't the sex that had changed but the meaning and judgment associated with it toward, most specifically, gay men. Or, as AIDS advocate Jim Pickett said at a recent conference for people living with HIV, "When a friend announces they are expecting a child, I feel like screaming, 'You barebacked!'"

But while intelligent minds and passionate advocates argued about the reasons and the proper response to barebacking, no one had dared document it on videotape for the erotic pleasure of others. Yet.

In 1998 two renegade companies formed to make bareback videos exclusively: Hot Desert Knights and Treasure Island Media. None of the leading gay pornographers would consider producing them (although they were eager to market their highly profitable backlists of videos produced "pre-AIDS" that featured bareback sex). The cheaply made videos by the upstart porn producers brought the sexual choices of an increasing number of men out of the closet and onto DVD players and computer screens.

The videos were uniform in their low production values, the older ages of the actors, and the fact that several of them appeared to have the physical manifestations of HIV. It was as if a group of men who had literally lived through AIDS said, "Oh, what the hell," and demonstrated the kind of sex they had been having amongst themselves for some time. Their exploits were perceived as an underground fetish that would never break the surface of more mainstream gay pornography.

But then Max Sohl met that ferociously attractive man at the Folsom Street Fair who was so eager to "get seeded" by a string of strangers, and with the sexual zeitgeist now primed for their arrival, they made a film that would forever change the porn industry and quite arguably influence the sexual behavior of countless gay men.

Re-christened "Dawson," the budding porn star was served up in a hotel room, over the course of New York City's 2004 Black Party weekend, to an ongoing parade of bareback tops. Their sex was filmed in a documentary fashion, without music, scripted dialogue, or any effort to hide the many cables and cameras crowding the room. Dawson's fantasy had been fulfilled, and Sohl had the footage to prove it.

In June 2004 Dawson's 20 Load Weekend was released and was precisely as advertised.

2012-07-09-DawsonDVDArtwork.JPGIt might first strike the viewer that the video was created in an unsettling world in which HIV is utterly absent -- that is, until a revamped sexual choreography is pointedly repeated again and again. While orgasms in gay porn before AIDS typically showed the top withdrawing from his partner and spilling his semen across his partner's backside, the tops servicing Dawson had a different and very deliberate mission: to withdraw only long enough to prove their orgasm, and then re-enter Dawson immediately to show the injection of semen.

This was not a film that was made in the absence of HIV but was created because of HIV. You can practically hear a disembodied voice whispering, "Watch closely. This is how gay men have sex now. That is where semen belongs. Fuck AIDS."

Depending on your point of view, it is either a transgressive act of eroticism or an incredibly irresponsible act that demonstrates how to become infected with HIV. Or perhaps both.

In the center of all this was Dawson himself, and never has bareback porn had such a virile and athletic leading man, much less one who bottomed with such disarming delight. "He was a higher-quality male model that hadn't been seen in that kind of extreme scene," said Sohl. "The movie changed things because of Dawson. He was adorable and actually smiles and laughs. He is joyful in that movie."

"Bareback porn companies have blood on their hands," became a common refrain among gay men and health advocates. Gay sex-advice columnist Dan Savage equated the videos to child porn, believing they take advantage of the naïve and the vulnerable. Some accused TIM of making snuff films.

The video was wildly successful, ubiquitous wherever porn was shown. Even Sohl was surprised. "Our staff and even my friends would say, 'I go into a porn booth, a sex party, a hookup, and it's playing,'" he said. "It was everywhere."

Adult bookstores that had previously shunned TIM videos responded to customer demand and began stocking them, even creating bareback sections on their shelves. Gay porn sites that once refused to feature bareback clips began including them. Dawson and the film became the definitive symbol of a bare, wanton sexuality that eschewed condoms and refused to be denied or intimidated by the virus.

Soon, more companies produced bareback porn, and they were able to attract "collegiate jock" types who were younger, more muscular, and the very picture of health and vitality. The faces and bodies in bareback videos had been transformed, erasing all evidence of HIV, much like the invisibility of HIV/AIDS in our broader culture.

When considering the legacy of his film, Sohl is more pragmatic than proud. "The concept of taking 20 loads in 2004 was beyond taboo, but to say it in 2012, it doesn't seem as extreme today," he said. "I'm sure someone else would have done it. It just so happened to be us."

Neither does Sohl admit to any trepidation about the safety of his actors, then or now. "I've been doing this since 2004, with thousands of men, and have had only one guy claim to get an STD (on my set)," he explained. "Probably 50 percent of my casting job is being an HIV counselor," he adds, without a hint of irony. "I spend a lot of time talking about HIV. My feeling is that people need to be responsible for their own actions and make informed decisions."

One of the people making decisions while living with HIV is none other than the actor known as Dawson, who disclosed his HIV-positive status to The Windy City Times in 2005. While his HIV status may surprise no one, something else he said in the interview was sadly revealing. "It was after turning positive that I made the decision to look into doing a movie for Treasure Island Media," he said at the time. "I had seroconverted a few months before..."

After an HIV diagnosis, many people use it as an opportunity to re-examine their lives, make different choices, or otherwise take steps to enjoy their life in whatever ways are important to them. For the man who would be Dawson, his seroconversion was followed by the choice to be an unapologetic cum whore in front of video cameras. This may have been his fantasy, but it certainly fuels the stigmatizing belief that people with HIV are irresponsible vectors of disease, spreading infection and abandoning whatever sexual values they may have previously held.

Perhaps, then, the film was a treatise on the kind of sexual liberation available to HIV-positive gay men today, demonstrating the "new normal" for those who take their meds, eliminate the viral activity in their blood, and "fuck freely and without fear," as TIM founder Paul Morris once put it. Or did it simply portray "poz" men as sluts, a charge leveled by disgusted (and possibly jealous) HIV-negative men?

"What a person is seeing has more to do with them than with us," said Sohl. "The best mode of action is not to confirm or deny anything. I will see a scene online that I directed," he says, referring to the many porn sites that pirate pieces of his work and give them new titles, "and it will be renamed 'Negative Bottom Takes Poz Loads,' as if it were a conversion scene. We never said that. Or people think the bottom is using crystal meth. That says more about the guy watching it than what actually happened."

That relationship, between porn and viewer, is something of particular concern to some HIV-prevention advocates who believe bareback porn encourages unsafe sex in real life. This resulted in AIDS Healthcare Foundation's recent campaign to mandate condom use on pornography sets, a move that was popular on a simplistic level but did nothing to address the myriad of factors associated with actual HIV risk and relative safety, such as an undetectable viral load, serosorting, or the precise sexual behaviors involved.

While social cognitive theory states that we make behavioral decisions based on watching others, very little research has been conducted on the causal relationship between bareback porn and real behavior. In what little has been studied, researchers can't decide whether barebackers watch a lot of bareback porn or bareback porn makes people barebackers.

It is a riddle that Max Sohl is surprisingly happy to solve. "Absolutely," he said. "Of course it is going to influence what people do." When asked, then, what is the responsibility of porn, Sohl would have none of it. "The responsibility of porn," he says impishly, "is to make the guy watching it shoot a load."

2012-07-09-DawsonD20bEDIT.jpgDawson is, now and forever, committed to videotape and featured on dozens of online porn sites, happily receiving the prize he so ardently desires. He and his progeny of newer, younger porn actors have crossed a line, and they're never coming back. Their video escapades are available online everywhere and for everyone, including young gay men who are just coming out and surfing the Internet for validation of their sexuality.

What those young men will almost certainly see online are depictions of unprotected sex, because bareback videos now outperform scenes of condom usage on every site that carries them -- and most of them now do. It is unquestionable that bareback sex will be viewed as typical to the uninitiated, and anyone crafting safer-sex messages to those young men is going to have a difficult time trumping those images. The use-a-condom-every-time message is officially dead, drowned in buckets of bodily fluids by Dawson and his barebacking brethren.

Dawson's 20 Load Weekend redefined bareback porn and the men who appear in such porn. It influenced subsequent videos and expanded the availability of bareback films. It depicted a prevailing truth about gay sexual behavior "post-AIDS" and arguably encouraged risky sexual adventure-seeking. It led to the saturation of bareback porn online, making unprotected sex normative to whomever might be watching. To dismiss this film, to minimize its social and cultural impact, would be to demonstrate a profound misunderstanding of gay sexuality today.

"Barebacking is a right," gay anthropologist Eric Rofes once wrote. "After all, practically every straight guy in the world gets to do it without being told they are irresponsible, foolish, or suicidal ... Barebacking is liberation. Barebacking is defiance."

How foolish, prescient, liberating, enlightening, or destructive barebacking may ultimately become is something that may only be revealed in the next chapter of our gay community's troubled history.

Mark S. King's written and video blog, My Fabulous Disease, chronicles his life as an HIV-positive gay man. He is also the author of A Place Like This, his memoir of Los Angeles during the dawn of AIDS.

(Photo of Dawson and Jesse O'Toole courtesy of Max Sohl and edited for content. Other images courtesy of Treasure Island Media.)

 

Follow Mark S. King on Twitter: www.twitter.com/MyFabDisease

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