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The Newest Oldest Form of Hair Removal

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A few weeks ago on Entourage, Turtle was thrown off by his girlfriend's lack of hair down there, saying he'd never seen a girl who was completely "shaved." I cringed. SHAVED? No, no, no, that is not the way anyone should remove hair. It's all about sugaring.
Is sugaring some new form of hair removal? Nope, it's reportedly been around since ancient Egyptian times, when women removed hair to look virginal. The paste is made from sugar, water and lemon and is rolled into a ball, which the technician (a.k.a. sugarer) rolls over the area where the hair is to be removed and flips it up sharply to remove the hair.
So why sugar instead of wax? I'll tell you why. For starters, it's much less painful than waxing. If waxing is an 8 on the pain scale, sugaring is a 3. (And there are no chances of getting burned, like hot wax can do.) Also, it pulls the entire root out, so over time, the hair disappears permanently, whereas waxing rips the hair rather than removing it. (How long the removal process takes depends on the area on the body and your hair type.) It's also more earth-friendly than wax. Waxing uses tongue depressors and cloth strips to pull off the wax, which go to landfills. The sugar ball, because it's made with natural ingredients, just decomposes, and it doesn't have to be used with sticks or strips. And those OCD-ers out there will appreciate how much more sanitary sugaring is--there are no worries of shared ingredients or double-dipping cross-contamination.
One caveat of sugaring: It's more expensive than waxing, but since hair removal is eventually permanent (in most cases), it ends up being less expensive in the long run.
I go to Studio Alexandria, in Brentwood, CA, owned by Lina Kennedy, who also trains aestheticians worldwide in the art. You can find a trained sugarer by calling 800-957-8427.
And for the men? (Which was a question Turtle also had -- if manscaping is necessary.) From backs to ears, and everywhere in between, they can sugar too.