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The Power of No: Just Say It

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How do you feel about saying "no?" I notice that saying "no" to certain people and in some situations can be challenging for me. Sometimes I find myself saying "yes" when "no" would really be more authentic. More covertly, I also find myself at times giving "half-truths" (which is quite an oxymoron if you think about it) to people when they present me with opportunities, engage with me about connecting, etc. You know what I mean, you run into someone and say, "We should really get together sometime," but you really have very little interest in or commitment to making that happen. Does this ever happen to you?

What is it about saying "no" that many of us have a hard time with? For me, it comes down to a few specific things. First of all, I get scared that people will get upset or disappointed if I say "no." Second, I'm not a huge fan of hearing "no" from others myself, so being the one saying it can be difficult for me. And lastly, I consider myself to be "yes" type of person. I pride myself on being open, willing, and ready to say "yes" at all times. In other words, "no" often seems like a failure, an admission of weakness, or just an overall negative thing to say.

However, saying "no" is one of the most important aspects of living a life filled with balance, integrity, and authenticity. Our ability and capacity to say "no" with confidence is one of the most important aspects of creating peace and power in our lives. This is about creating healthy boundaries, honoring ourselves, and being real -- it's not about being closed, cynical, or unwilling.

The majority of people I know, especially these days, live their lives with a feeling of "overwhelm" that either runs them or at least gets in their way from time to time. If you think of the aspects of your life where you feel most overwhelmed, stressed out, or ineffective, there is probably a common theme going on: you haven't said "no" when you needed to. If you also think about any relationships in your life where these is stress, struggle, or conflict, you saying "no" with honesty and kindness is also probably missing.

When we don't say "no" in an authentic way we end up feeling burdened, resentful, and even victimized (although, ironically, we forget that we are the ones who said "yes" in the first place).

Saying "no" does have real consequences. Sometimes we will upset, disappoint, or annoy people. We also may have a significant amount of fear about saying "no" to certain people (our spouse, boss, co-worker, friend, child, etc.) or in certain situations (at work, with clients, with our in-laws, and more).

However, there are huge benefits to us enhancing our capacity and comfort with "no." Tapping into the power of "no" creates freedom, liberation, and a real sense of trust with the people in our lives. When we're someone that says "yes" when we mean it and "no" when we mean it -- others know they can count on us to be real, tell the truth, and come through.

And, when we "no" with confidence, honesty, and compassion, we do one of the best things we can possibly do to honor and appreciate ourselves.

Mike Robbins is a sought-after motivational keynote speaker, coach, and the bestselling author of Focus on the Good Stuff (Wiley) and Be Yourself, Everyone Else is Already Taken (Wiley). More info - www.Mike-Robbins.com