Huffpost Impact
THE BLOG

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors

Nell Edgington Headshot

How the Board Can Really Step Up to the Fundraising Plate

Posted: Updated:
Print

2013-07-08-dartboard.jpg
It's no secret that nonprofits struggle with money. In fact, the Nonprofit Finance Fund's most recent State of the Nonprofit Sector Survey found that 41% of nonprofit respondents ran a deficit in 2012. If we really want to rewrite this rule for the nonprofit sector, we need to make some pretty big changes.

So here's a radical idea.

What if every nonprofit board were responsible for bringing in 10% of their nonprofit's annual operating budget?

That means that if your nonprofit's budget is $1 million, your board would be responsible for raising $100,000 each year. They could do that through a combination of give/get activities, meaning they could all write personal checks (at whatever level makes sense for them individually) and then use their unique skills, experience and networks to raise the remaining amount.

That's a crazy idea, right?

I don't think so. Here's why.

The Board Must Really Understand the Money Engine
A board of directors simply cannot separate themselves from the financial engine of their nonprofit. The entire board must fully understand and contribute to how money flows to the organization. They cannot argue that money is the purview of the staff; money HAS to be part of the board's job. Until we make the board really participate in making the financial engine run, they won't be able to have substantive conversations about how to raise or spend that money.

The Board Must Share the Burden
I'm so tired of silly, small board fundraising goals. Does a 15 member board that brings in only $15,000 out of a $1 million budget really make a difference? Absolutely not. That's pennies. If they are truly going to lead the nonprofit that they serve, they must share the financial burden. Ten percent of the operating budget starts to make a significant dent, so let's start there.

The Board Must Tap Into Their Unique Assets
I am not suggesting that we force every board member to ask individuals for money. Far from it. Rather, I'm arguing that nonprofits start getting really strategic about tapping into each individual board member's strengths and assets in order to make a bold fundraising goal a reality.

But you can't just turn to the board and tell them to bring 10% in the door. Some things are going to have to dramatically change in order to make it a reality.

Here's what you have to do:

If we really want to see a shift in how the nonprofit sector is funded, we need to make some pretty radical changes to business as usual. So start to entertain the idea. What would it look like if your board brought in 10% of your annual budget?