iOS app Android app

Cognitive Bias

Two Strikes and You're Out (But Only If You're Black)

Wray Herbert | Posted 01.14.2015 | Science
Wray Herbert

According to the U.S. Office for Civil Rights, black students are more than three times as likely as white students to be suspended or expelled from school. Surprisingly, there has been little scientific study of the psychological processes underlying this discipline gap.

Are You a Political Extremist?

Wray Herbert | Posted 01.04.2015 | Science
Wray Herbert

The results taken together are consistent with a view of the political extremist as thoughtful and confident, not unthinking. This does not mean of course that extreme political positions are necessarily sound or that they are not biased in other ways, but it does raise doubts about the mindless ideologue stereotype.

Is Powerlessness the Key to Successful Negotiation?

Wray Herbert | Posted 12.23.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

Leigh Steinberg, the inspiration for the title character in the film Jerry Maguire, is one of the most successful agents in the history of American sports. He is also a master negotiator. Psychological scientists believe they may have an explanation for Steinberg's seemingly irrational behavior and for its ironic success.

The Term Homophobia Is Improper

Mark Baer | Posted 11.30.2014 | Politics
Read More: Homophobic, Reaction-Formation, Catholicism, Lesbian, Christian, Religious Beliefs, God, Sex Change, LGBT Youth, Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Gay and Lesbian Rights, Discrimination, John Stewart, Low Self-Esteem, Empathetic, Religions, Catholic Nun, Catholic Celibacy, Reaction Formation, Narcissist, Catholic Church Sex Abuse, Psychopath, Homophobia, Sex Change Surgery, Hateful, Mediator, Scripture, Psychopathic-Personality, LGBT Issues, Belief Systems, Sexual Orientation, Catholic Sex Abuse, Cognitive Bias, Catholic Church, Gay Discrimination, Alienation, Cognitive Dissonance, Hate Crime, Hate Speech, Old Testament, Religious Diversity, Equality, Personal Beliefs, Low Self Esteem, Gay, Celibacy, Catholics, Gay Prejudice, Psychopathy, Religious Belief, Homophobe, Jews, Hate Crimes, The Bible, Lgbtq, Empathy, Evangelical Christians, Anti-Gay Prejudice, Homosexual, Sexual Orientation Discrimination, Gays and Lesbians, Same Sex Couples, Beliefs, Same-Sex Marriage, Brendon Ayanbadejo, Psychopaths, Gay Equality, Sexual Prejudice, LGBT Community, Jewish, Jesus, Mediation, Lesbians, Peacemakers, Vow of Celibacy, Faith, Peacemaking, Sexual-Prejudice, Peacemaker, Gay Panic Defense, Roman Catholic Church Sex Abuse Scandal, Hate, Middle East Conflict, Cognitive Biases, Catholic Church Celibacy, Self-Esteem, Belief in God, Lgbt, Homosexuality, LGBT Discrimination, Same Sex Marriage, Religion and Politics, Gay-Panic-Defense, Biases, Gay Marriage, Anti-Gay Hate Crimes, Humanities Education, Narcissistic, Judgmental, Prejudice, Priest Celibacy, Priestly Celibacy, Anti-Gay Discrimination, Hateful-Acts, Gay Rights, Middle East, Greek Mythology, Bias, Religion and Sexuality, Fairness, LGBT Families, Belief, LGBT Equality, Psychopathic Personality, Roman Catholic Church, Psychopathic, Gods, Marriage Equality, Religion, Self Esteem, Religious Differences, Humanities, Jesus Christ, Narcissism, LGBT Rights, Christianity, Gays, Gay Issues, Politics News
Mark Baer

Religion aside, I firmly believe that those who argue that homosexuality is a choice do so in order to justify senseless beatings of gays and lesbians, and continued discrimination and mistreatment against them. I also believe without a doubt that it is a choice to be a nasty human being.

Why Good Prosecutors Do Bad Things: Pending California Legislation on Prosecutorial Misconduct

Burke E. Strunsky | Posted 11.22.2014 | Crime
Burke E. Strunsky

Despite the U.S. Supreme Court's 1963 ruling holding that a prosecutor must disclose all exculpatory evidence (evidence that helps the defense) there are still too many deliberate failures by prosecutors to disclose important evidence in serious criminal trials.

Wealth, Welfare and the Brother-in-Law Rule

Wray Herbert | Posted 11.10.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

One of the enigmas of our political landscape is the impoverished Republican. This is the American with very little money, and many unmet needs, who nevertheless votes for people and policies that will deny him or her assistance. Indeed, many of the reddest states in the nation are among the largest beneficiaries of government aid.

First Impression Bias - How to Avoid the Prejudice Trap

Thomas Gelmi | Posted 10.26.2014 | Business
Thomas Gelmi

Make yourself aware of the fact that your experiences can also have a negative effect, keeping you from being more effective. Realize that preconceived opinions and ideas can obstruct your view of the essential.

Is Racism Just a Form of Stupidity?

Wray Herbert | Posted 10.20.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

A small cadre of psychological scientists have continued over the years to explore the controversial connection between low intelligence and prejudice, and at this point they have overcome most of the methodological barricades, allowing them to rigorously analyze and answer this important societal question.

Was Rialto Unified School District's Holocaust Assignment Really About Critical Thinking?

Mark Baer | Posted 10.04.2014 | Education
Mark Baer

Although a great deal has been written about the "critical thinking" assignment given to eighth graders in the Rialto Unified School District on whether or not the Holocaust ever occurred, I feel compelled to provide my perspective.

Redskin Psychology: The Origins of Cruel Caricatures

Wray Herbert | Posted 08.11.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

My hometown football team has been under fire for many years for using the derogatory term "redskin" as its team mascot. As it should. Indeed, the stereotype existed long before the football team -- even before football. But where and how do such mean-spirited and distorted caricatures get started?

Wrapping a Present for the Future

Wray Herbert | Posted 08.10.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

Maybe there is some risk in overzealously documenting our lives. There are certainly times to put that camera away and join in the fun. But these findings suggest that there may also be risk in failing to create mementos. The seemingly dull and quotidian details of our everyday lives may be the emotional treasures of the future.

Do You Have Inner Gender Bias?

Suna Senman | Posted 07.21.2014 | Women
Suna Senman

Your brain is processing many more thoughts than you are aware of. Getting beyond this cognitive bias requires taking a fresh look at yourself and the world. To dispel your own cognitive bias, objectively observe masculine and feminine qualities in their basic, organic state as the equinox.

A Time for Teachers

Paul Dunion, Ed.D., LPC | Posted 07.13.2014 | Healthy Living
Paul Dunion, Ed.D., LPC

We are in a time calling for genuine teachers. It is such a time because we are in dire need of critical lessons, which include: • How do we avoid ...

Your Mind on Social Media

Deborah R. Glasofer, Ph.D. | Posted 06.17.2014 | Healthy Living
Deborah R. Glasofer, Ph.D.

Ever post a status update on Facebook and feel distraught when no one "likes" or comments on it? Does the prospect of being misunderstood on Twitter keep you from participating in the digital dialogue?

The Psychology of a Memorable Lunch

Wray Herbert | Posted 06.16.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

Our choices have implications, not only for how much we enjoy lunch today, but also for longer term goals like fitness and health. But how do we choose? What are the basic cognitive processes that lead from initial hunger pang to this soup or that sandwich?

The Brooding Mind: Making the Worst of Ambiguity

Wray Herbert | Posted 05.17.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

Brooders see their own problems as debilitating, and this self-focus sabotages any real effort to make things better. It leads to all sorts of negative feelings, which in turn lead to more ruminative thinking, creating a perilous cycle of thought and emotion.

Mental Health on the Go

Wray Herbert | Posted 04.09.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

Severe, debilitating anxiety has afflicted Scott Stossel his entire life, a life he describes in his morbidly fascinating new memoir, My Age of Anxiety. His case may be especially tormenting, but he is far from alone in this plight.

Why Do Giraffes Have Long Necks?

Wray Herbert | Posted 01.25.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

Clearly the giraffe evolved this uncommon and helpful trait in order to reach those nourishing leaves. That's how natural selection works. If you're a 6-year-old.

The Face(s) of the GOP. Who Do You See?

Wray Herbert | Posted 12.08.2013 | Science
Wray Herbert

Can people be so biased by their political attitudes that they look out and see a different world, a world where up is down and black is white? I came across a new study this week that argues just that.

Mindfulness And Loss: The Past Is Just the Past

Wray Herbert | Posted 10.22.2013 | Science
Wray Herbert

The sunk-cost bias is the tendency to persist with an endeavor once we've made an investment of money or time or effort. A team of psychological scientists has been exploring the possibility that mindfulness meditation might help people overcome this particular kind of irrational thinking.

When the Law Is Involved, Do Notions Of Fairness Matter?

Mark Baer | Posted 09.28.2013 | Divorce
Mark Baer

When attorneys, mediators and others are involved in the process, their concepts of fairness may well differ from those of one or both of the parties and from those of the other professionals involved.

Is Tribalism Inevitable?

Rosabeth Moss Kanter | Posted 09.25.2013 | Politics
Rosabeth Moss Kanter

Human nature allows us to think our way out of blindspots. Tribalism is muted by other human creations, such as diverse communities with complex structures and more universalistic values. We call that civilization.

Cognitive Biases and Vulnerable Student Success

Karen Gross | Posted 09.23.2013 | College
Karen Gross

Our cognitive bias impacts others but also our perception of ourselves. When we become better aware, we can reduce the error rates in thinking about colleges/universities, our current and prospective students and ourselves -- for the betterment of individuals, institutions and the public good.

Is Mediation About Reaching the Same Result in a More Efficient and Economical Manner?

Mark Baer | Posted 08.31.2013 | Divorce
Mark Baer

My last article on mediation, titled "Should Divorcing Couples Who Mediate Be Talking Through Counsel?," was the first of a series of articles on medi...

Spooky Judgments: How Agents Think About Danger

Wray Herbert | Posted 08.18.2013 | Science
Wray Herbert

We hire and train intelligence agents to weigh risks and make judgments, and most of us want to believe that these assessments are sound. But how rational are the individual men and women who are making the life-and-death decisions that influence national security?