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Crispr

For Genome Editing, Self-Regulation Beats a Government Ban

Techonomy | Posted 06.18.2015 | Science
Techonomy

Gene editing has been around for years, but CRISPR is a new version of it. Taken from a mechanism commonly used by bacteria to recognize invading viruses, it has proven remarkably useful and effective in altering other organisms since it was first adapted in 2012.

Taking Control of Our Genetic Information: Could it Go Too Far?

Karthika Muthukumaraswamy | Posted 06.17.2015 | Technology
Karthika Muthukumaraswamy

Up until recently, those in the technology industry and those conducting genomic research would have been considered strange bedfellows. But big data -- more specifically, big genomic data -- is bringing the two groups together.

Bad DNA? Not a Problem For Much Longer

Charlotte Fitzek | Posted 05.18.2015 | Science
Charlotte Fitzek

before Gattaca becomes more than just science fiction, lawmakers, physicians, geneticists, and ethicists -- the global community -- must engage in some honest discussions about when we put the brakes on gene experimentation and alteration.

CRISPR Opportunities ... For What? And for Whom?

Pete Shanks | Posted 02.09.2015 | Science
Pete Shanks

Money and deals are flowing into companies that promise to edit genes. Human, animal, plant, all kinds of DNA may be on the cutting board. And once the replacements are pasted in, the results could dramatically change our lives -- for better or for worse.

Epigenetics II: Cellular Memory, Imprinting, and Targeting Genome Configuration With RNA

James A. Shapiro | Posted 09.12.2012 | Science
James A. Shapiro

This is number two in my series on epigenetic control of genome restructuring and hereditary transmission of traits modified by life history events. We are going to take a detour through some classic bacterial genetics history, but it will ultimately bring us back, with new insights, to epigenetic regulation.