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Ébola virus

Ebola Is Far From Over In Guinea And Sierra Leone

AP | YOUSSOUF BAH | Posted 06.25.2015 | Health News

CONAKRY, Guinea (AP) — Despite hopes that the deadly Ebola outbreak could soon be contained in West Africa, it shows no signs of abating in Guinea a...

After the Ebola Epidemic... What's Next for Africa?

Bekeh Utietiang | Posted 06.18.2015 | World
Bekeh Utietiang

Disease in Africa is a perennial problem and cannot be resolved with short-gap measures such as occasional interventions when there are epidemics. The problem is structural and systemic and requires the West to address the actual problem and not make Africa recipients of perpetual Western charity

Bill Clinton Says He's Ebola-Free After Annual Africa Trip, Raises Awareness For Issue

The Huffington Post | Robbie Couch | Posted 06.01.2015 | Impact

Bill Clinton used his time at the podium on Thursday to stump for improved health infrastructures in the developing world -- and to assure the crowd h...

Ebola: The Overlooked Sexually Transmitted Disease

Mardia Stone | Posted 05.26.2015 | World
Mardia Stone

It is documented that Ebola virus remains in the sperm and breast milk of survivors, for up to 90 days or longer, indicating that the virus is sexually and maternally transmitted. Aid agencies distribute condoms to men who recovered from Ebola, disregarding reported failures in adherence to "don't have sex for 3 months."

Liberia Declared Free Of Ebola After Weeks Without New Cases

AP | Posted 05.11.2015 | World

MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) -- Liberia is now free of Ebola after going 42 days - twice the maximum incubation period for the deadly disease - without any ...

Weekend Roundup: A New Cold War Is Brewing in the Pacific

Nathan Gardels | Posted 05.08.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

Is a new Cold War brewing in the Pacific between China and the U.S. with Japan playing a front line role? Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to Washington last week alarmingly pushed developments in that direction. In a blog he adapted from his well-received speech to the U.S. Congress, Abe proposes that the two democratic post-WWII allies join in a "seamless" strategic effort to "to spread and nurture our shared values" and "stick to the path" that "won the Cold War" -- and, in so many words not spoken, to contain China. By excluding China, the world's second largest economy, from the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership on trade while embracing the revision of Japan's pacifist constitution to allow military action beyond self-defense without an apology for colonialism and aggression acceptable to its Asian neighbors, the U.S. and Japan are laying the cornerstone of a new bloc system in the Pacific. As Minxin Pei writes, China's leaders will certainly see it that way and respond in kind. (continued)

Ebola Survivors Can Spread Disease Through Sex For Longer Than Previously Thought

AP | MIKE STOBBE | Posted 05.04.2015 | Healthy Living

NEW YORK (AP) — Health officials now think Ebola survivors can spread the disease through unprotected sex nearly twice as long as previously believe...

Weekend Roundup: The WorldPost Hosts Fareed Zakaria

Nathan Gardels | Posted 05.01.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

This week, The WorldPost hosted a book party in Los Angeles for CNN's Fareed Zakaria as part of the launch of his new treatise, "In Defense of a Liberal Education." He is also a member of the Berggruen Institute's 21st Century Council. Attendees included, among many others, Rwandan President Paul Kagame, former Pakistani Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz, financiers Steve Schwarzman, David Bonderman and Mohamed el-Erian, California State Senator Bob Hertzberg, former California Governor Gray Davis and Hollywood producers Brian Grazer, Lawrence Bender and Mike Medavoy. Economist Nouriel Roubini, essayist Pico Iyer and Harvard historian Niall Ferguson also attended. Israeli-American media mogul Haim Saban sparred with Zakaria over the rights of Palestinians and the future of Israel as a democratic state. Jack Miles, editor of the "Norton Anthology of World Religions," writes in The WorldPost this week that America is losing in the Mideast because its foreign policy has been technology-focused (drones, etc.) instead of humanities-focused (history, religion, etc.). (continued)

Weekend Roundup: 'The Wretched of the Earth' Are on the Move as Migrants

Nathan Gardels | Posted 06.24.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

"The wretched of the earth," in Frantz Fanon's famous phrase, are on the move as migrants. Mostly, they have headed north across scorching deserts and menacing seas to follow their dreams of escaping poverty and finding a better life. As the writer Carlos Monsivais once quipped, "Los Angeles is the heart of the Mexican Dream." Now, as we see at both the U.S. border and European shores, migrants are also fleeing north in the rusty holds of doomed ships from Libya or the "La Bestia" death train from Central America to evade the nightmares of civil war, brutal Salvadoran street gangs or merciless Mexican drug cartels. (continued)

Weekend Roundup: Work With Nature, Not Against It

Nathan Gardels | Posted 06.17.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

Since Earth Day, which will be marked on April 22, was first commemorated 45 years ago, we have learned a lot about the planet's ecology. Above all, we have begun to understand the biological intelligence of nature itself that, for millennia, has managed to continually regenerate and stabilize that narrow band of a livable climate that has enabled our species and others to thrive. Working with nature, not against it, to combat climate change is the message of the Leo DiCaprio-narrated short video documentary, "Restoration," we publish this week. As senior Chinese diplomat Wu Jianmin writes from Beijing, we are also learning to work together as nations through geo-environmental cooperation, as exemplified by the recent U.S.-China agreement to jointly reduce carbon gases. (continued)

Weekend Roundup: As Mideast War Levels Ancient Cities, Asia Invests in the Future

Nathan Gardels | Posted 06.10.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

While the Middle East is consumed by an orgy of destruction that has devastated ancient cities like Aleppo and Tikrit, Asia, led by China, is building out the infrastructure of the future. While past wounds drive the tribal and religious rivalries in the Middle East, in Asia the contest -- and the cooperation -- is about shaping the future. The most recent scuffle in the contest over the future has been the slew of American allies -- Great Britain, Italy, France, Australia and others -- who have defied U.S. admonitions not to join the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, which it sees as a rival to the World Bank and IMF system. In the "cooperation" column, Zbigniew Brzezinski observes in a WorldPost interview that China signed on as a guarantor of the Lausanne agreement on Iran's nuclear program. This, along with the fact it has also joined with the U.S. to curb North Korean nuclear proliferation and fight climate change, shows China is stepping up to the plate as a responsible global power. Former MI6 agent Alastair Crooke writes from Beirut that the U.S. has been "immobilized" in the Sunni-Shia proxy wars and must settle for "an equilibrium of antagonisms." (continued)

Barack vs. Bibi, Round __

Thane Rosenbaum | Posted 06.04.2015 | Politics
Thane Rosenbaum

Forgive me for wondering whether the daily dealings between President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu are taking a page from the Rocky Balboa vs. Apollo Creed playbook -- without the Marquees of Queensberry Rules.

How Technology is Turning the Tide in Ebola

David Walton | Posted 06.06.2015 | Impact
David Walton

Technology has a critical role to play in both acute epidemics like the Ebola outbreak as well as the more chronic inequities in health outcomes that preferentially affect the poor.

Weekend Roundup: Yemen Ignites New Mideast War Within Islam

Nathan Gardels | Posted 06.03.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

If reading the next sentence about the bewildering tangle of so many bloody crossed swords in the Middle East makes your head hurt, just be thankful you live somewhere else where decapitation is not a regular occurrence. The intensifying Saudi-led Sunni coalition assault on Iranian-linked Shiite tribes in Yemen this week -- at the very moment when Shiite militia allied with the U.S.-backed Iraqi government were ousting Saudi Wahhabist-inspired Islamic State jihadis from Tikrit -- signaled the onset of a generalized sectarian religious war across the region. And if the current bright spot of the interim agreement with Western powers that curbs Iran's capacity to weaponize its uranium enrichment program should unravel over the coming months, the entire conflict threatens to go nuclear. Graham Fuller, former vice-chair of the CIA's National Intelligence Council and a former station chief in several Mideast countries, deciphers the perplexing labyrinth of the Yemeni conflict, where "the enemy of my enemy is also my enemy." (continued)

Weekend Roundup: Death of the First Global Statesman

Nathan Gardels | Posted 05.27.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

This week, Singapore's founding father, Lee Kuan Yew, died at 91. Though the last remaining of the great figures of post-WWII decolonization, Lee was also the first global statesman. As he himself put it, "when we were pushed out of Malaysia we had no hinterland. So we had to do or die, and the globalization of the world helped us. So we made the world our hinterland." By thinking global, but acting local, Lee was able to vault his small city-state from the Third World to the First World. The WorldPost remembers Lee through his own words from interviews I have done with him over the years. Writing from Singapore, Pranay Gupte focuses on Lee's unique accomplishment of "clean governance." Writing from Beijing, philosopher Daniel A. Bell emphasizes Singapore's meritocratic government as the core of its success with lessons for China. (continued)

No, Ebola Is Not Mutating Into A 'Supervirus'

Posted 03.27.2015 | Healthy Living

The Ebola virus that is causing the current outbreak in West Africa is not mutating as quickly as earlier reports had suggested, a new study finds...

Weekend Roundup: The Politics of Polarization Always Ends Badly

Nathan Gardels | Posted 05.20.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

Whether in Russia, Venezuela or Israel, the ugly politics of polarization may work in winning elections -- but it always ends badly. Netanyahu's scaremongering against Arab voters and dashing of a two-state solution (his bad faith post-election backtrack notwithstanding) dispels two long-held illusions at once: that Israeli democracy would be inclusive or that Palestinians would have their own state. If there is no room for Palestinians anywhere, then what? In an exclusive interview with the Huffington Post, (full interview to be released Saturday), U.S. President Barack Obama addresses the Israeli election, Iran and other issues. Writing from Amman, prominent Palestinian journalist Daoud Kuttab draws the logical conclusion from Israel's election results that Palestinians must now pursue their own unilateral path and that the world community should no longer feel bound to defend Israel in international institutions. (continued)

First Patient Diagnosed With Ebola In Liberia After 2 Week Hiatus

AP | Posted 03.20.2015 | World

MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — A patient has tested positive for Ebola in Liberia's capital, officials said Friday, deflating hopes that the West African ...

Weekend Roundup: How Japan's Past Shadows Asia's Future

Nathan Gardels | Posted 05.13.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

TOKYO -- Looking out onto Tokyo's towering neon cityscape, it is difficult to imagine the utter devastation of Japan's capital 70 years ago this week in one of the world's greatest overlooked atrocities -- the unsparing American firebombing that incinerated more people than either of the nuclear attacks on Hiroshima or Nagasaki. In this respect, Japan is a long way from its past. But a visit to Tokyo this week by German Chancellor Angela Merkel -- during which she noted how her country had accepted culpability for its WWII fascist aggression in a way that Japan has not -- also highlights how the past still shadows the present -- and the future -- in Asia. (In Europe also the past has returned from another angle as Greece is demanding reparations from Germany). (continued)

Hope in the Fight to End Ebola

Wendy Diamond | Posted 05.11.2015 | Impact
Wendy Diamond

It's our global responsibility towards humanity to encourage compassion for those suffering, and support efforts to completely eliminate the Ebola virus by the end of 2015. Together we can make this happen!

Weekend Roundup: Preparing to Be Disrupted

Nathan Gardels | Posted 05.06.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

This week, The WorldPost conference on "The Future of Work" took place at Lancaster House in London. Discussion around the theme "prepare to be disrupted" ranged from how the emergent sharing economy, along with 3D desktop manufacturing, would take work back into the home to worries that automation could eliminate as much as 47 percent of current jobs in the United States.

How 'Dumb Phones' Can Help Stop The Spread Of Ebola

The Huffington Post | Robbie Couch | Posted 03.06.2015 | Impact

A basic cell phone may not be able to snap the best selfies, but it can be a vital tool in preventing the spread of deadly viruses. In Ebola-strick...

Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient

AP | Posted 05.05.2015 | World

MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Liberia released its last Ebola patient, a 58-year old English teacher, from a treatment center in the capital on Thursday,...

Safety for Women and Girls: Protection Strategies for a Healthful World

Susan M. Blaustein | Posted 05.04.2015 | Impact
Susan M. Blaustein

Safety is not linear; to ensure that a clinic can cope with a medical emergency such as the Ebola crisis and continue to handle routine care requires substantial strengthening of an entire health system.

Weekend Roundup: A Sigh of Relief in Europe

Nathan Gardels | Posted 04.29.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

Though nothing is finally settled, Europe this week breathed a sigh of relief. Greece's Syriza-led government backed down in its confrontation with its EU partners over austerity policies and, after bloody skirmishes in the early days of a new cease-fire agreement, the combatants in Ukraine backed off. Not everyone was happy in Greece, though. Manolis Glezos, a 92-year-old WWII Greek resistance hero and prominent member of Syriza, writes that "I apologize to the Greek people for collaborating in this illusion" that the new government would break free of the crushing bailout constraints. Greek journalist Thanos Dimadis argues that standing up to Germany on Greek terms was itself a victory despite compromises. Writing from Kyiv, former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko hopes that "Minsk 2.0" will bring peace, but worries that there is no enforcement mechanism.