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Francis Fukuyama


Francis Levy | Posted 10.14.2016 | Books
Francis Levy

Francis Fukuyama dealt a blow to Hegelian dialectics when he wrote The End of History and the Last Man and before that the sociologist Daniel Bell had...

The Folly Of Philippines' Autocratic Nostalgia

Richard Javad Heydarian | Posted 06.15.2016 | World
Richard Javad Heydarian

MANILA, Philippines -- "The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion," Edmund Burke, the great 18th century conservative thinker, once warned. Today, a specter is hunting the democratic world -- the specter of autocratic nostalgia.

The End of Philippine Democracy?

Richard Javad Heydarian | Posted 05.06.2016 | World
Richard Javad Heydarian

"Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one," Albert Einstein once famously declared. On the surface, the Philippines is a bustling e...

Philippines' Black Swan Elections: The New Normal in Democratic Politics

Richard Javad Heydarian | Posted 12.14.2015 | Politics
Richard Javad Heydarian

The challenge for democrats today, whether in Metro Manila or Washington D.C., is to end dysfunctional forms of decision-making that are giving a bad name to democracy -- the greatest gift of modernity.

Philippines' Competition Conundrum: A Nation of Oligopolies, Dynasties and Autocratic Nostalgia

Richard Javad Heydarian | Posted 08.19.2016 | Business
Richard Javad Heydarian

As Benigno "NoyNoy" Aquino entered his final year in office, the question of how to assess his legacy has gained greater salience. Both his opponents and supporters have powerful arguments to present.

Philippine Economy and Elections: How Political Cycles Shape Emerging Markets

Richard Javad Heydarian | Posted 05.21.2016 | World
Richard Javad Heydarian

Soon, the Philippines will be engulfed by an election fever. And in promising emerging markets like the Philippines, electoral cycles are extremely crucial to shaping the short-to-medium term growth trajectory of the country.

Where Are Today's "Best and Brightest"?

Charles Kolb | Posted 06.27.2015 | Politics
Charles Kolb

Obama may have disliked some of Churchill's activities earlier in his career, but there can be little question that during the West's darkest hour in several centuries, it was Winston Churchill who saved civilization. We face similar challenges today.

Fukuyama Talks To China About The Sorry State Of American Democracy

The WorldPost | Nathan Gardels | Posted 03.30.2015 | World

In this premiere episode of a new Chinese Youku series produced by, Shanghai scholar/entrepreneur Eric X. Li talks with political scientist...

Public and Private in Poland

John Feffer | Posted 04.20.2015 | World
John Feffer

Poles are happier than they've been in years. More than 80 percent report that they are "very happy" or "quite happy," and that number has risen steadily since 2000. But happiness in Poland seems to derive largely from private life. There's not a lot of volunteering, and even the rates of Church attendance have been going down.

Obama and the Gordian Knot of Politics

John Feffer | Posted 01.28.2015 | World
John Feffer

The world is more complicated. The knots are somehow knottier. Bringing in a council of concerned citizens to patiently untie the Gordian knot of politics may take longer. But, in the end, consent is mightier than the sword.

What's Behind the New Chinese-Russian-Iranian Alliance?

David Oualaalou | Posted 01.24.2015 | Politics
David Oualaalou

The agreement between Iran and Russia came at a critical time as the West debates two key provisions: (a) what options the West has in case negotiations with Iran fail, and (b) whether the West will move forward with imposing additional sanctions on Russia.

Which Hazard Is Better Contained: Ebola or Extreme Economic Inequality?

Timothy J. Barnett | Posted 12.27.2014 | Politics
Timothy J. Barnett

Design changes in Ebola management protocols make it highly probable that the Ebola hazard in America will be successfully contained. In contrast, the hazard of wealth-concentration policies implemented by central banks is not under containment. This problem threatens the very fabric of democratic enterprise.

A Weaker West Opens the Way for the Rest of the World -- Good and Bad

Pankaj Mishra | Posted 12.20.2014 | World
Pankaj Mishra

This moment demands a fresh interrogation of what theologian Reinhold Neibuhr euphemistically called "the highly contingent achievements of the west," and closer attention to the varied histories of the non-west. Instead, the most common response to the present crisis has been despair over western "weakness" -- and much acrimony over what Barack Obama, president of the "sole superpower" and the "indispensable nation" should have done to fix it.

The End of Thinking?

Henry Mintzberg | Posted 09.10.2014 | World
Henry Mintzberg

History did not end in 1989, but for too many of the people who bought into Francis Fukuyama's influential "End of History?" article, what ended then was thinking. A failure to understand that successful countries of the West maintain a balance of power across the public, private, and plural sectors of society has been throwing the U.S. and many other countries out of balance ever since.

Francis Fukuyama: End of History Still in Sight Despite China's Rise

Winston Shi | Posted 09.08.2014 | World
Winston Shi

According to "End of History" author Francis Fukuyama, China today is much like Bismarck's Germany. It was not a messianic, universalistic or revisionist state, but was very big and powerful, and it had a lot of national interests. China is very much like that today.

Hungary's U-Turn

John Feffer | Posted 08.06.2014 | World
John Feffer

How could the world be heading inexorably in the direction of market democracy when even the country long considered next in line for membership in the European Community was collapsing into war, nationalist extremism, and ethnic cleansing?

Fukuyama And Ferguson: Obama Projects Weakness In A Dangerous World

The WorldPost | Nathan Gardels | Posted 05.02.2014 | World

At the Milken Institute Global Conference earlier this week, I sat down with political theorist Francis Fukuyama and historian Niall Ferguson to discu...

Fukuyama and the Decay of American Institutions

Luka Orešković | Posted 05.04.2014 | Politics
Luka Orešković

The predominance of courts in the everyday American decision-making process clearly shows that the "regular" process of legislating through Congress and effectively implementing policies through the bureaucracy and executive branch is somewhat dysfunctional.

Some Thoughts for This Year's World Economic Forum

Ali Wyne | Posted 03.25.2014 | World
Ali Wyne

While America's regenerative capacity has thus far allowed it to offset underperforming governance, hoping or trusting that it'll do so indefinitely doesn't seem like a smart bet. Nor will avowing its exceptionalism address its systemic challenges.

The End of History

Francis Levy | Posted 10.28.2013 | Politics
Francis Levy

In an interview with Foreign Affairs ("The Polish Model," May/June 2013), Radek Sikorski, Poland's minister of foreign affairs, remarks, "The twentiet...

America's Perfect Storm

Richard Schiffman | Posted 02.09.2013 | Business
Richard Schiffman

It is as if America woke up one morning to find that its arteries were sclerotic, its limbs stiff, its appetites and drives waning. Can we rouse ourselves and recover the suppleness of youth?

Ideas, Leadership, and the New Left: A Reply to Fukuyama

Peter Fox-Penner, PhD | Posted 09.27.2012 | Politics
Peter Fox-Penner, PhD

For the last 50 years, the political dialog between the Western Left and Right has not been about a choice between market democracies and some other archetypal system. The debate has been, and remains, over democracy's span of control -- its size, function, and funding.

LIBOR and Super PACs: A Heck of a Way to Run Capitalist Democracy

Joseph A. Palermo | Posted 09.08.2012 | Politics
Joseph A. Palermo

We live in an age where both our politics and our markets are being managed in a way where we never get a chance to see who is really pulling the strings.

What Happened to the Generation Gap?

Kurt Ellenberger | Posted 07.16.2012 | Home
Kurt Ellenberger

Why are teenagers listening to music that their parents were dancing to 25 years ago instead of rebelling against it? When I was 13, I may have had some knowledge of pop stars from a quarter century earlier, but I certainly didn't like any of their music.

Is That All There Is? Rugged Indvidualism

Dimitri Hamlin | Posted 05.14.2012 | Religion
Dimitri Hamlin

It's a good thing that, when push comes to shove, we're really not rugged individualists. I'm thinking that it's almost time for us to accept who we are.