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Judiciary

Albania's Long Road to Reform

Fred Abrahams | Posted 08.03.2016 | World
Fred Abrahams

After 18 months of debate and delay, advocates for reform in Albania released a collective cheer in late July when parliament approved constitutional ...

When Violence Trumps the Constitution, Democracy Is in Peril

Josh Horwitz | Posted 06.06.2016 | Politics
Josh Horwitz

I've been writing for years about the threat of insurrectionism in this country. Now I'm watching my fears come to fruition in this current political climate, where violence is increasingly becoming an acceptable response to court rulings, or political disagreements.

Judgmental Judges Are Enemies of Progress

Ottilia Anna Maunganidze | Posted 05.11.2016 | World
Ottilia Anna Maunganidze

In an ideal world, judges do not subscribe to Cesare Lombroso's racialised typology of a criminal. Instead, they must apply their minds to each case without fear, favor or prejudice.

Playing Chess with the Fact Checkers

Roy Zimmerman | Posted 03.30.2016 | Comedy
Roy Zimmerman

How many songs get fact-checked? Well, mine for one. I co-wrote a song called "65 Million (Mitch McConnell STFU)" with my wife Melanie. We took th...

65 Million (Mitch Mcconnell STFU)

Roy Zimmerman | Posted 03.16.2016 | Comedy
Roy Zimmerman

Mitch McConnell swore to uphold the Constitution, and he's doing his best to hold it up....

Create Fixed Judicial Terms to Depoliticize Supreme Court Nominations

Doug Bandow | Posted 03.14.2016 | Politics
Doug Bandow

The Constitution gives the Senate the power to advise and consent. That body is empowered to say no as well as yes. And the most important qualification for office is philosophical. Put simply: Does the nominee believe the Constitution means anything apart from the jurists' personal preferences? If not, then the Senate should reject the nomination.

Four Steps to Appointing a Supreme Court Justice

The Conversation US | Posted 02.15.2016 | Politics
The Conversation US

Leaving Justice Scalia's seat empty until there is a new president would mean that difficult cases this term could come down to a tie, evenly split along ideological lines. So what will it take to get a new justice named?

The Paradox of Increasing Judicial Power and Diminishing Democratic Will in Contemporary America

Rajesh Sampath | Posted 02.03.2016 | Politics
Rajesh Sampath

No doubt, judicial power has grown quietly and discreetly over time. Federal judges seem to have the power to overturn state bans against gay marriage when state legislatures create laws defining marriage as that between a heterosexual man and woman.

Why Courts Matter: The Iowa Caucus

Donna Red Wing | Posted 02.02.2016 | Queer Voices
Donna Red Wing

The judicial emergency crisis in our federal courts is too often an issue left out of major political conversation. This has also been true of the 201...

The War at Home: Four Ways Good Faith Can Help Defeat ISIS

David Briggs | Posted 12.15.2015 | Religion
David Briggs

What much research proposes, and history also teaches, is that democracy flourishes when we start with the idea that all people are created equal, and endowed with certain inalienable rights.

Corporations Now Have Their Own Private Judiciary System

David Morris | Posted 10.04.2016 | Politics
David Morris

Since Republicans gained control of Congress little has been done. The Arbitration Act, which would broadly void forced arbitration contracts, has languished in Congress for six years. A bill to prohibit any school receiving federal student aid from restricting students' ability to pursue legal claims in court likely will not come to a vote.

Reforming Our Justice System

Carla DiMare | Posted 06.19.2016 | Politics
Carla DiMare

How do we improve the judiciary? Easy. Change the law. Some suggestions will cost our country virtually nothing, but will reap benefits of fairness, justice, social order and peace, particularly for the most vulnerable.

This Is How Republicans Would Oppose the Keystone Pipeline

Paul Abrams | Posted 03.29.2015 | Politics
Paul Abrams

Republicans do not rank their policy talking points from the most important to the least. Instead, they find those that resonate at the most basic level, and that can be easily drummed into peoples' psyches.

Charlie Hebdo, Islam and Religious Freedom: Study Finds Independent Courts, Civility Best Protect Liberties, Lessen Conflict

David Briggs | Posted 03.28.2015 | Religion
David Briggs

What the new research suggests is that promoting freedom is less about any belief system or form of government than a commitment for nations to follow through on their constitutional promises to uphold religious freedoms.

Revisiting Kafka's Castle in New Turkey

Alparslan Akkuş | Posted 03.11.2015 | World
Alparslan Akkuş

In today's Turkey, the controversial 1150-room palace of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, dubbed AK Saray, is no less than Kafka's Castle in terms of its absurdity.

Egyptian Justice Under Collapse

Diana Eltahawy | Posted 03.01.2015 | World
Diana Eltahawy

Egyptian courts have allowed alleged perpetrators of killings and torture from security agencies to walk free, sometimes without ever appearing in court, while relatives of those killed by police brutality suffer in silence.

What Grubergate Teaches Us About the Need for Judicial Engagement

Evan Bernick | Posted 01.19.2015 | Politics
Evan Bernick

Judges in every case ought to evaluate the government's arguments in a way that is sensitive to the ugly reality of legislative sausage-making rather than adopting the unwarranted assumption that we have found angels in the form of politicians and bureaucrats to govern us.

Yes, in Your Country: Judge Says City of Philadelphia Can Take Artist's Studio, Turn It Into Grocery Store

Evan Bernick | Posted 01.05.2015 | Politics
Evan Bernick

James Dupree is a world-renowned artist and native son of Philadelphia, who is about to see his art studio turned into a grocery store, thanks to the rubber-stamp review that passes for judging when his city exercises the power of eminent domain.

Hollow Justice and Courts of Order in an Age of Government-Sanctioned Tyranny

John W. Whitehead | Posted 12.22.2014 | Politics
John W. Whitehead

With every passing day, it becomes more apparent that we live in an age of hollow justice, with government courts, largely lacking in vision and scope, rendering narrow rulings focused on the letter of the law.

Fast Track Courts Against Criminal Lawmakers 'Imperative' for Indian Democracy

Samarth Pathak | Posted 10.29.2014 | World
Samarth Pathak

A wide section of India's politico-legal fraternity has expressed disappointment with the apex court's recent rejection of a proposal to fast track criminal cases against parliamentarians.

Legal Liability for Injuries to a Caregiver Caused by an Alzheimer's Patient

Brad Reid | Posted 10.15.2014 | Business
Brad Reid

A California Supreme Court majority decision recently determined that an employee of an in-home health care agency who was injured by a patient suffer...

May Musharraf Escape Treason?

Liaquat Ali Khan | Posted 09.18.2014 | Politics
Liaquat Ali Khan

The political elite of Pakistan are divided over the prosecution of General Musharraf. While a listless prosecution is moving at a snail pace, some prominent politicians are speaking against the wisdom of prosecution.

Launch the 'Nuke,' Harry!

Chris Weigant | Posted 01.25.2014 | Politics
Chris Weigant

There's an old adage in politics that the way to win political struggles is to "bring a gun to a knife fight." If this imagery isn't violent enough for you, the subject on the table now is whether Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is considering what is called the "nuclear option."

Ryan J. Reilly

Shutdown May Impact Victim Of Federal Courthouse Shooting

HuffingtonPost.com | Ryan J. Reilly | Posted 10.09.2013 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- The court security officer injured in a shooting at a federal courthouse in West Virginia could be out of a paycheck after next week if ...

Self-inflicted Wounds: New Alaska Laws Reject Statehood

John Aronno | Posted 08.26.2013 | Politics
John Aronno

The signing of these bills into law is the closest any state has come to seceding. One resolution went so far as to urge the federal government to "recede." We have officially adopted laws asserting autonomy and authority over the union of which we are a part, to which we pledge allegiance to.