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Herta Müller: On Inger Christensen

Louisiana Channel | Posted 10.08.2015 | Arts
Louisiana Channel

Herta Müller (b. 1953) is a German-Romanian novelist, poet and essayist. Müller is noted for her works depicting the effects of violence, cruelty and terror, typically set in communist Romania during the Nicolae Ceausescu regime, which she herself experienced.

A Thrilling Compendium of Queer Kenyan Lives

Diriye Osman | Posted 10.07.2015 | Arts
Diriye Osman

This is an anthology that demands to be read again and again for its sheer ambition, scope and quiet power. The NEST Collective is to be commended for putting together such a thrilling and vital addition to the global LGBT literary canon.

Make Time for Rhyme

Susan B. Katz | Posted 10.06.2015 | Books
Susan B. Katz

I grew up on a diet of books by the master rhymer, Dr. Seuss. I devoured Green Eggs and Ham, the Sneetches and that crazy cat on the loose. As a teacher for 20 years, I did lots of rug read alouds. Rhyme sure does please the little listener crowds.

Henning Mankell: Theatre Resembles Life

Louisiana Channel | Posted 10.06.2015 | Arts
Louisiana Channel

Since the very beginning of his career, Henning Mankell (born 1948) has taken an immense interest in theatre. As long ago as in the 1970s, he worked with Swedish theaters, writing and staging plays.

Profiling the 15 Types of Movie Villains

ScreenCraft | Posted 10.09.2015 | Entertainment

Before we get into the logistics of what makes a villain a villain, what drives them, and what types of villains fit best into any given genre or story, we must first define the word and differentiate it from another classic cinematic term -- "antagonist."

Banned Book Week at the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library

Kimann Schultz | Posted 10.02.2015 | Books
Kimann Schultz

Here it is already again, Banned Book Week at the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library. Used to be it was merely colored leaves and jack-o-lantern decorations that heralded the arrival of the Autumn season.

Why Did They Ban Teen Fiction--'My Enemy, My Brother'--in 1983?

Gabriel Schivone | Posted 10.01.2015 | Books
Gabriel Schivone

An eye-catching exhibit during Banned Book Week 2015 resurrects the history of a 1983 book-banning in Tucson, AZ.

YA Virtual Book Clubs Are on the Rise, and Here's Why You Should Join One Too!

Valerie Tejeda | Posted 10.01.2015 | Books
Valerie Tejeda

Reading used to be something we did in solitude, but thanks to the Internet, things have changed dramatically. Now, reading has become something people from all around the world can partake in together, meeting on social media sites to talk about their favorite books.

Will Movies and TV Shows Eventually Kill the Written Word?

Warren Adler | Posted 09.25.2015 | Books
Warren Adler

As a longtime practitioner of the art of fiction writing and a committed reader of the works of others, I have been thinking a great deal about the impact of the proliferating film/TV industry on the future of reading.

LGBTQ Literature Creates Social Justice in the Classrooms and Beyond

Michael Carosone | Posted 09.23.2015 | Gay Voices
Michael Carosone

When LGBTQ literature is taught, read and analyzed in the community college English classroom, the clear message is that it is important enough to study and to include in the curriculum; therefore, LGBTQ people must be important enough to be considered as human beings and citizens.

10 New Fall Books That Should Be On Your Nightstand

Sharon Greenthal | Posted 09.23.2015 | Fifty
Sharon Greenthal

I can't wait to get my hands on all of these books! From the soul-soothing words of Brene Brown to the historical observations of Margo Jefferson, there's something this fall for everyone.

On Photography By Susan Sontag: A Must-Read For Every Serious Photographer

Michael Ernest Sweet | Posted 09.22.2015 | Arts
Michael Ernest Sweet

Susan Sontag's 1973 book, On Photography, is a true classic and should be read by all photographers. Not only is the book a great intellectual stimula...

What I Learned From Self-Publishing My Book

Abby Rosmarin | Posted 09.18.2015 | Books
Abby Rosmarin

After letting the idea swim in my head for a few years, I finally got the chutzpah to write (and finish) it. After countless read-throughs and edits, I declared my book done and facetiously exclaimed: "Time to get money!" Well, not so much.

The August Day Mark Twain Met Donald Trump

Michael Winship | Posted 09.14.2015 | Politics
Michael Winship

How I spent my summer vacation -- part of it, at least. One weekend in August, my girlfriend Pat and I went upstate to visit my sister, also named Patricia, and while there took a field trip to Elmira, New York

Shakespeare's Secret Legacy

Paul Hunting | Posted 09.04.2015 | Books
Paul Hunting

For thousands upon thousands of years great sages, masters, seers, prophets and teachers have been attempting to convey to us the ultimate truth about who we really are, where we come from and why we're here on this planet. Yet, to most people, it still remains a mystery.

11 Unforgettable First Lines in Literature

Off The Shelf | Posted 08.28.2015 | Books
Off The Shelf

If the eyes are the windows to the soul, then the first line is the window to the book. A first line can drag you in, shock you, confuse you, or touch you. A first line is what makes you read on. Here are some of our favorite first lines that set the tone for some incredible books.

The Mysterious, Anonymous Author Elena Ferrante on the Conclusion of Her Neapolitan Novels

Vanity Fair | Posted 08.28.2015 | Books
Vanity Fair

BY ELISSA SCHAPPELL "I prefer to think of myself as being inside a tangled knot; tangled knots fascinate me." The Community Bookstore in Park Slop...

The Mysterious, Anonymous Author Elena Ferrante on the Conclusion of Her Neapolitan Novels

Vanity Fair | Posted 08.28.2015 | Books
Vanity Fair

BY ELISSA SCHAPPELL "I prefer to think of myself as being inside a tangled knot; tangled knots fascinate me." The Community Bookstore in Park Slop...

The Mysterious, Anonymous Author Elena Ferrante on the Conclusion of Her Neapolitan Novels

Vanity Fair | Posted 08.28.2015 | Books
Vanity Fair

If readers of Ferrante's three previous Neapolitan novels wonder which one of these women was the brilliant friend, the end of The Lost Child leaves no question. This is Ferrante at the height of her brilliance.

The End of the Tour Fails to Capture the Energy of its Subject

Michael Darer | Posted 08.25.2015 | Books
Michael Darer

Wallace and his work (Infinite Jest in particular) have been formative and dear to me in a way that's difficult to express without sounding disturbed. Wallace's prose is absolutely singular, combining brilliant playful formalism, gleeful trivia and an unabashed devotion to raw sincerity.

A Timeless Beach Read to Treasure and Savor

Off The Shelf | Posted 08.25.2015 | Books
Off The Shelf

Writers come and go with new generations. Young readers today might not know Rosamunde Pilcher. But her books remain as timeless as the classics. I treasure all her books, but The Shell Seekers is her masterpiece. Do yourself a favor: pick up a copy and savor every word.

Cook Like Hermoine Granger and 11 Other Ladies of Literature

Food52 | Posted 08.21.2015 | Taste

I love throwing dinner parties, but preparing for them can be insanely stressful. I find that it helps to organize them around a specific theme--the more specific, the better. This menu here is inspired by some of my favorite heroines in literature.

Parenting and Print: Defending the Traditional Bedtime Story

Nick Fouche | Posted 08.14.2015 | Books
Nick Fouche

In my experience, encouraging a relationship with books assists in communicating to children the idea of literacy as an invitation to that exciting 'effort' and 'quest' which can also be an adventure in itself.

Goodnight Moon, Goodnight Parenting, Goodnight Guilt: How To Be A Better Parent Than You Have Ever Been

Margaret Hession | Posted 08.13.2015 | Parents
Margaret Hession

To somehow yoke the term parenting with the concept of an obstacle course of terrors seems somewhat frightening, and honestly an unlikely partnership of sorts. And yet, ironically, this description actually comes close to describing the profound mystery of parenting Americans are faced almost every day.

Summer Reads

Poetry Foundation | Posted 08.07.2015 | Books
Poetry Foundation

As much of the country remains in the clutches of a heat wave, we find ourselves daydreaming of languorous, leisurely activities. For us, that always includes reading.